Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
Travel

Amsterdam opposes pot-shop law

Drug Trafficking

The Netherlands plans to ban foreigners from the country's famed pot shops, a decision Amsterdam's tourism industry hopes goes up in smoke.

The Dutch Cabinet late last month said the measure was needed to "reduce nuisance and drugs tourism," arguing that "substance use of minors has to be countered more strongly and that coffee shops have grown into large points of sale of cannabis that are hard to manage."

Known as the "Weed Pass," the measure will turn coffee shops into private clubs for Dutch citizens older than 18.

"Persons who do not hold Dutch citizenship will not have access to the coffee shops," the Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice said in a statement.

The government said the measure also is needed to crack down on drug trafficking near the borders with Germany and Belgium.

Under the current plan, the measure will go into effect this year in the southern part of the country and the rest of the country in 2012.

The city of Amsterdam, including its mayor, has vowed to fight the measure.

"The Dutch government has decided upon this for the whole of the Netherlands. Amsterdam doesn't want it," said Machteld Ligtvoet, a spokeswoman for the Amsterdam Tourism & Convention Board.

The Amsterdam Tourism & Convention Board says the new measure should be dismissed because it discriminates against foreigners. The board also says it fears "soft drugs will be sold on the street again."

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
Drug Trafficking
  • Two patrons smoke a joint
    Two patrons smoke a joint

    Jonathan and Mateo of Belgium smoke a joint inside a coffee shop in Rosendaal, Brabant. The mayors of about 30 Dutch municipalities will meet in Almere, north-east of the capital Amsterdam, to urge the government to act against the nuisance they claim is caused by drug tourism. In 1976, the...

  • Chasing Poe's ghost in Charleston
    Chasing Poe's ghost in Charleston

    CHARLESTON, S.C. — Travelers searching for traces of the moody, mysterious scribe who famously wrote "The Raven," and classic macabre tales need not ponder weak and weary over volumes of forgotten lore.

Comments
Loading