TUESDAY, JULY 1ST

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2ND

THURSDAY, JULY 3RD

FRIDAY, JULY 4TH

There will be no shows these nights due to Cubs baseball games.

 

MONDAY, JULY 7TH

ORIGINAL SIN

What is original sin?  What are it’s origins, and how did it become one of the most divisive ideas in history?  One of our guests tonight has written a book that takes on this topic.  In Original Sin: A Cultural History, Alan Jacobs takes us through the origins and history of the concept and examines how it has evolved over the centuries.  Jacobs shows how, over time, the concept of original sin has shaped our thinking, literature, laws, and world events.  Jacobs, who is professor of English at Wheaton College will be joined by Tom Carson, professor of philosophy at Loyola University.



TUESDAY, JULY 8TH

WEDNESDAY, JULY 9TH

Tune in tonight after the 7:05 Cubs games for a shortened edition Extension 720.

 

THURSDAY, JULY 10TH

THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

After one of the longest primary fights in recent memory, we finally know who the two candidates for the major parties will be.  As the general election campaign goes into full swing, it is time to begin handicapping the race between the two candidates.  We’ll be joined tonight by three guests including Blake Dvorak, assistant editor at Real Clear Politics and Chris Robling, a political consultant and principal at Jayne Thompson and Associates.

 

FRIDAY, JULY 11TH

WEB 2.0
We hear about the emerging world of Web 2.0 every day.  Facebook, Flickr, Digg, Twitter, Vimeo, Youtube…what do all these websites do?  There’s a new web boom going on today, something that many people have dubbed web 2.0.  Basically, web 2.0 is the ability of a website to interact with the user, instead of just being there to be seen.  We’ll fill you in tonight as we help you navigate the myriad of websites and web services springing up everyday in this new Internet economy.

 

MONDAY, JULY 14TH

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

Here at Extension 720, we’re always discussing books.  But where does the urge to read great books come from?  Well, from reading Children’s stories, of course!  Or so that’s what our guest tonight says in his book Children’s Literature: A Reader’s History from Aesop to Harry Potter.  Seth Lerer, professor of Humanities and English at Stanford University, discusses how children’s stories have transformed through the years, from the allegorical epics of the nineteenth century, to the acerbic wit of Judy Bloom today.  Join us tonight for an interesting and informative discussion and perhaps a reading or two from some of your favorite children’s stories.