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Douglas MacArthur

Douglas MacArthur
General of the Army Douglas MacArthur played prominent roles in the Pacific theater of World War II and in the Korean War. He was designated to command the invasion of Japan in November 1945, and when that was no longer necessary he officially accepted their surrender. MacArthur oversaw the occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1951 and is credited for implementing democratic changes.Gen. MacArthur is entombed in a memorial in Norfolk, Va.
General of the Army Douglas MacArthur played prominent roles in the Pacific theater of World War II and in the Korean War. He was designated to command the invasion of Japan in November 1945, and when that was no longer necessary he officially accepted their surrender. MacArthur oversaw the occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1951 and is credited for implementing democratic changes.Gen. MacArthur is entombed in a memorial in Norfolk, Va. « Show less

Top Douglas MacArthur Articles

Displaying items 37-48
  • Samuel P. Huntington dies at 81; author of 'The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order'

    Samuel P. Huntington, a political scientist who argued that future conflicts would have their seeds in culture and religion rather than friction between nations, has died, Harvard University announced Saturday. He was 81. Huntington died Wednesday at a...
  • George Steinbrenner dies at 80; owner of New York Yankees

    George Steinbrenner dies at 80; owner of New York Yankees
    George Steinbrenner, who made his name synonymous with the revival of the New York Yankees as a dominant baseball team and leveraged multiple championships into business ventures that forever changed the economics of the sport, has died. He was 80....
  • JFK and Vietnam

    JFK and Vietnam
    The assassination of John F. Kennedy 45 years ago today brought an abrupt end to what his admirers called Camelot, a presidential era of glamour, intelligence, wit and possibility. But the murder had an even more profound consequence: Nov. 22, 1963, was...
  • Free speech for officers?

    Today, Korb and Carter discuss instances in which military officers have publicly disagreed with the president's policies. Previously, they discussed the proper military oversight role for Congress. Later in the week, they'll discuss the Air Force...
  • Who freed Asia?

    President bush is not generally known for his firm grasp of history. But this has not stopped him from using history to justify his policies -- most recently in a speech to U.S. veterans in which he defended his aim to "stay the course" in Iraq by...
  • A study in contradictions

    Like his childhood, like his college and graduate years, like his presidency, like his role in his wife's campaign—like everything about him— Bill Clinton's postpresidential years are a mass of complexities and contradictions. He can soar in...
  • Our claims to fame

    She's from here? That's right here? They make those here? Yes, yes and yes. From Ella Fitzgerald to Williamsburg to Peace Frogs, we've got people, places and things worth talking about. PEOPLE Princess Pocahontas, Capt. John Smith and Chief Powhatan...
  • Wes Clark hits McCain landmine, again

     
    by Frank James What was it that Gen. Douglas MacArthur said about old soldiers not dying but merely fading away? It's safe to guess that Sen. Barack Obama's presidential campaign would like Gen. Wesley Clark (ret.) to fade away right......
  • Petraeus moves up and out of Iraq

     
    by Frank James Gen. David Petraeus, architect of the U.S. military's surge strategy, now widely viewed as a great success for bringing down the levels of violence in Iraq, officially turned over command of U.S. and allied forces in......
  • Farewell to The Swamp

     
    by Frank James The Swamp. The name seemed perfect from the start, from before the start, for a blog about Washington. The nation's capital was built on what was once partly a mosquito-ridden marsh, after all. And what city feels......
  • Paul V. Coates – Confidential File, Oct. 28, 1959

     
    Nippon Women Split on Retaining Geisha LADIES DAY IN TOKYO: The flowery era of Madame Butterfly is dying, but not quite dead in the postwar life of Japan. Under the democracy dictated to them by Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Japanese women got the vote in 1946....
  • Paul V. Coates – Confidential File, Oct. 29, 1959

     
    Women of Japan Enjoy Their Liberty LADIES DAY IN TOKYO (Part Two) -- When General of the Army Douglas MacArthur returned, as he had somehow hurriedly promised to do, Japan got its first taste of democracy. In the manner of a triumphant but just warrior,...