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Ralph Friedgen

Ralph Friedgen is a former head football coach of the University of Maryland Terrapins, a post he held from the 2001 season until 2010. Friedgen originally came to College Park as a player after a standout high school career in Harrison, N.Y., where he played quarterback on his father's team. At Maryland, Friedgen was switched to offensive guard. After graduating from Maryland in 1970, Friedgen embarked on his coaching career, starting as a graduate assistant with the Terps. He followed that up with assistant coaching positions at The Citadel, William & Mary, Murray State and then back to Maryland from 1982-86. The Terps made four bowl games and won three consecutive ACC championships during... Show more »
Ralph Friedgen is a former head football coach of the University of Maryland Terrapins, a post he held from the 2001 season until 2010. Friedgen originally came to College Park as a player after a standout high school career in Harrison, N.Y., where he played quarterback on his father's team. At Maryland, Friedgen was switched to offensive guard. After graduating from Maryland in 1970, Friedgen embarked on his coaching career, starting as a graduate assistant with the Terps. He followed that up with assistant coaching positions at The Citadel, William & Mary, Murray State and then back to Maryland from 1982-86. The Terps made four bowl games and won three consecutive ACC championships during this time. After a five-year stint as Georgia Tech's offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach (which included a Yellow Jackets national title in 1990), Friedgen moved to the NFL with the San Diego Chargers. There he coached under Bobby Ross, who also had Friedgen on his staffs at Maryland, Georgia Tech and The Citadel. The NFL highlight for Friedgen was the Chargers' 1994 Super Bowl appearance. After the 1996 season, Friedgen returned to Georgia Tech for a four-year stint as offensive coordinator. Maryland fired head coach Ron Vanderlinden in 2000, and athletic director Debbie Yow tapped Friedgen for his first head coaching job ever. During his first year at the helm (2001), Maryland won its first ACC championship since 1985. For that accomplishment, Friedgen was named national coach of the year. Friedgen was replaced at Maryland by Randy Edsall. « Show less

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