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Johnny Unitas

John Constantine Unitas played quarterback for 18 seasons in the National Football League.

Unitas, also affectionately known as "Johnny U," was a member of the Baltimore Colts for 17 years, and he finished his career with the San Diego Chargers. Unitas threw for 40,239 yards and 290 touchdowns in his career.

Uniats was born on May 7, 1933 in Pittsburgh, Pa., and died on Sept. 11, 2002, in Timonium, Md. Towson University's football stadium is named in honor of Unitas.
John Constantine Unitas played quarterback for 18 seasons in the National Football League.

Unitas, also affectionately known as "Johnny U," was a member of the Baltimore Colts for 17 years, and he finished his career with the San Diego Chargers. Unitas threw for 40,239 yards and 290 touchdowns in his career.

Uniats was born on May 7, 1933 in Pittsburgh, Pa., and died on Sept. 11, 2002, in Timonium, Md. Towson University's football stadium is named in honor of Unitas.
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Top Johnny Unitas Articles

Displaying items 121-132
  • At Club 4100, memories

    Dino Spanomanolis smoked cigarettes and sipped his coffee yesterday morning at Club 4100, the restaurant in Brooklyn Park he and his brother Manny own, waiting for the tribute to the man who often sat on the stool he now occupied - John Unitas. When it...
  • Fans turn out at Ravens game to pay respects to Colts' Unitas

    The funeral for John Unitas is tomorrow, but the wake began yesterday, when the past and future of Baltimore football merged at Ravens Stadium. The afternoon ended with a sparse crowd and a somber locker room as quarterback Chris Redman and a young...
  • Youngster's drive couldn't be sacked

    When John Unitas was in seventh grade at a Catholic grade school in the hard hills south of downtown Pittsburgh, his teacher asked each of the students in his class what they wanted to be when they grew up. A pro football player, Unitas said. His...
  • Nineteen touched by No. 19

    Awe-struck schoolboy Dick Jerardi Jerardi has worked a thousand locker rooms and big events as a sports reporter for the Philadelphia Daily News. Four decades ago, when he was in the seventh or eighth grade at Cathedral School, he still placed his...
  • The mix that made him great

    They came to watch the cold war, to be fought at Memorial Stadium on an icy Sunday in late November 1958. On the field, Popsicle-hard at 2 o'clock, the high-flying Colts readied to play San Francisco, a team Baltimore had rarely beaten. At game time, the...
  • Game 7: Unhurried Flutie runs down win

    Who's next, John Unitas? The Ravens have run out of quarterbacks and offensive options, and yesterday they ran out of time in a 13-10 loss to the Buffalo Bills before 68,673 at PSINet Stadium.The script has become familiar. The defense plays well...
  • A Baltimore legend, champion of underdogs

    John Steadman, who chronicled the Maryland sports scene in his newspaper columns, books and commentaries in a career that spanned seven decades, died of cancer yesterday at a Towson hospice. He was 73. A one-time minor-league baseball player, Mr....
  • Chuck Thompson's voice resonates from his book

    Chuck Thompson arrived behind a microphone back in that distant, primordial time when big league baseball players left their gloves on the field between innings and scoreboards were still operated manually. He remembers broadcasting one game "by peeking...
  • Hall-of-Fame Voice

    Thousands of Marylanders have grown up thinking that the sound of Chuck Thompson's voice is as much a part of a radio's apparatus as the volume switch or the channel selector. To so many of those people, that voice is the sound of summer, just as Old Bay...
  • Game 1: New era, old errors

    It took the city of Baltimore and the state of Maryland nearly 14 years to get a new stadium constructed, and the Ravens only three hours and one minute to lose their first game in the facility. The new $223 million stadium was a house of horror for the...
  • Game 15: Ravens make it a fond farewell

    There was almost one more miracle on 33rd Street. Almost. When cornerback John Williams knocked down Steve McNair's pass to Frank Wycheck at the Ravens' 34-yard line with 16 seconds left, the final chapter of the illustrious history of the NFL at...
  • Earl Morrall dies at 79; key NFL backup quarterback

    Earl Morrall was the NFL's answer to a brilliant Broadway understudy. He left his mark on NFL history by stepping in for two future Hall of Fame quarterbacks — Johnny Unitas in Baltimore and Bob Griese in Miami — and turning in a string of...