Having a family and enjoying a successful career are often seen as two incompatible goals for working moms and dads. Here's some advice from several fathers who don't put work above raising their kids.

I always try to do the right thing and make as many events as I can, but it's not always possible. You have to be realistic. You're not going to be at everything, but you can attend a lot of things like school plays if you're careful with your own personal days."—Steve H., Gurnee, Illinois

"I had to stay home a lot with my son when he first started school this year because he got really sick and had to take days off of school. I could feel the tension when I returned to work. My wife and I basically split the days off over a two-week period and I worked from home, came in at night and didn't avoid any of the work I had to get done, but that didn't stop people from making snide remarks. I don't care."—Carl F., Lisle, Illinois

"I don't try to talk too much about my children at work but I definitely let people know that I'm a father of three girls and that they're very important to me. I think people make the mistake of not mentioning their kids because they think it annoys people, but if you don't mention them, how do others know that they're a priority in their your life?"— Brookfield, Illinois

"My kids are very important to me. I don't let work set limits on what I can and can't do with them. Dads need to decide that early on during their career and you go from there. Things usually take care of themselves that way."—Mike M., Chicago, Illinois

"Watch what you say in front of your kids about work, about family, about friends, about politicians, etc. They remember what you say and sometimes, it's not very flattering and it's not always fair to them. You can ruin your reputation with them that way."—F.M., Glenview, Illinois

"Don't take work home with you. I try to be honest with my family about money, especially now that things are tight, but I don't want them to stress out about my job and money like I do." —M.E., Chicago, Illinois

"Sit down and talk with them when you're home. Don't retreat to the basement or sit in front of the TV all day long."—Stan W., Harwood Heights, Illinois