A critical digest of the week's latest U.S. theatrical releases. Where applicable, links to longer reviews have been provided.

One Direction: This Is Us
Distributor: Sony
Once one reaches a certain age, the procession of teen pop idols becomes a cruel reminder of the passage of time and the inevitability of death. For any non-teenager attending Morgan Spurlock's concert documentary "One Direction: This Is Us," intimations of mortality will be felt most strongly during the "classic cover song" section of the group's set, wherein the boy band reaches all the way back to Blondie's "One Way or Another" and Wheatus' 2000 golden oldie "Teenage Dirtbag." Yet the film's central fivesome prove charming pallbearers throughout the film, which alternates between inspired and insipid as it hits its hagiographic marks. Directioners should show up in full force.
-- Andrew Barker
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Closed Circuit
Distributor:
Focus Features
Opening a week after Bradley Manning's sentencing in the U.S., where significant portions of the case were held in secret to protect national security, British courtroom thriller "Closed Circuit" challenges the validity of policies that shield key evidence from public scrutiny. Since the topic itself isn't especially sexy, screenwriter Steven Knight cooks up a plot in which a pair of defense lawyers who were once a couple find themselves on opposite sides of the secrecy divide, injecting romantic intrigue into this slick, smarter-than-usual conspiracy yarn -- a late-summer counter-programmer for those who prefer brain stimulation to having their eyeballs and eardrums pummeled.
-- Peter Debruge
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Getaway
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Those seeking an object lesson in the relative value of art and commerce in Hollywood need look no further than Ethan Hawke, who kicked off the summer movie season with Richard Linklater's "Before Midnight" and now brings it to a close with "Getaway," another tale of an American expat winding his way through an exotic foreign locale. Only here, instead of thoughtful discourse about love and sex and aging against the stunning vistas of Greece, we get the grinding gears of a souped-up Shelby Mustang racing through grimy Bulgaria with It Girl Selena Gomez in tow. Arriving in theaters on the sputtering exhaust of producer Joel Silver's longtime Warner Bros. deal, this booby prize of a parting gift may nevertheless score some quick cash from undiscriminating Labor Day moviegoers hoping against hope for some "Fast & Furious"-level thrills.
-- Scott Foundas
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