Violations of state sanitation and safety laws recently observed by inspectors at eight South Florida restaurants last week prompted the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation to cite the owners and briefly suspend operations, reports show.

High priority violations and some intermediate level violations found by inspectors at each place are listed below. To see one of DBPR’s full reports, please search our database.

Mario the Baker, 14691 Biscayne Boulevard, North Miami Beach was closed May 20 after an inspector observed violations that included: Ready-to-eat, potentially hazardous marinara sauce prepared on site and held more than 24 hours was not properly date-marked; the certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of food borne illnesses and symptoms that would prevent an employee from working with food, clean equipment and utensils; no proof of required, state-approved employee training was provided for any workers; a toxic substance/chemical, powder cleanser, was stored over spices on a back shelf; 21 live roaches were on the premises; 10 dead roaches were in a back storage area and live, small flying insects were in a food prep area and dish machine sanitizer was not at proper minimum strength.

The business was allowed to reopen May 20, when no live roaches were found during a callback inspection. A manager could not be reached for comment.

Jade Flower, 3105 W. Broward Blvd., Fort Lauderdale was closed May 22 after an inspector observed violations that included: A live roach was found in a container of rice and a stop sale order was issued; ready-to-eat, potentially hazardous food prepared on site and held more than 24 hours was not properly date-marked; a newspaper was used after frying to store foods; in addition to the roach in the rice, 38 other live roaches were seen, including 20 in a cabinet under a rice cooker, 12 behind a cabinet and six on a storage shelf above a food prep counter.

The business was allowed to reopen May 23 after a follow-up inspection found the conditions that created a threat to public health and safety no longer existed.  The manager could not be reached for comment.

Chick ‘N Chop on the Grill, 18255 Pines Boulevard, Pembroke Pines was closed May 20 after an inspector observed violations that included: More than 10 dead roaches were on the kitchen floor and more than 10 dead roaches were on cabinets in the front counter area; 17 live roaches were on the premises; a cooler was not maintaining potentially hazardous foods at proper temperatures; single-use gloves were not changed as needed after a worker touched mouth/face and then engaged in food prep; raw eggs were stored over cut tomatoes and ready-to-eat, potentially hazardous food prepared on site and held more than 24 hours was not properly date-marked.

The business was allowed to reopen May 21 after a follow-up inspection found the conditions that created a threat to public health and safety no longer existed. The manager declined to comment.

Loza Hot Dogs mobile food vendor, 4136 E. 8th Lane, Hialeah was closed May 19 after an inspector observed violations that included: No sanitizer of any kind available for ware washing; a hand washing sink was removed from food prep/dishwashing area; the establishment was operating without a license and the manager lacked proof of food manager certification.  As of Thursday morning, there was no application for a license on file, a DBPR spokeswoman said. The owner could not be reached for comment.

World Famous Mr. Boneless, 1807 NW 79th Street, Miami was closed May 22 after an inspector observed violations that included: Non-exempt fish offered raw or undercooked had not undergone proper parasite destruction; raw animal foods were not properly separated from one another; the certified food manager or person in charge lacked knowledge of food borne illnesses and symptoms of illness that would prevent en employee from working with food, clean equipment and utensils; a faucet at a three-compartment sink did not reach all compartments; roach excrement was present all around the kitchen; the establishment was operating without a license; the manager lacked proof of food manager certification, and proof of required, state-approved training for all employees was not available for some workers. As of Thursday morning, there was no application for a license on file, a DBPR spokeswoman said. The owner could not be reached for comment.

Caribbean Sizzling, 18200 NW 27th Ave., Miami was closed May 22 after an inspector observed violations that included: Ready-to-eat, potentially hazardous food prepared on site and held more than 24 hours was not properly date-marked; a grocery bag was used to cover food; fresh and dried rodent droppings were on top of a water heater, more than 20 were inside cabinets and on a small counter top and hundreds were under a counter in the food prep area; 14 live roaches were seen, including one by the water heater, five in a glue trap by the stove, four behind a cooker and four walking on the floor around the front counter. Also, an employee failed to wash hands before putting on gloves to work with food, and proof of required, state-approved training for all employees was not available for some workers.

The business was allowed to reopen May 23 when it was found conditions were no longer a threat to public health and safety. A manager could not be reached for comment.

Cholos Ceviche & Grill, 1127 NE 163rd Street, North Miami Beach was closed May 19 after an inspector observed violations that included:  Raw animal food was stored over ready-to-eat food; an employee failed to wash hands before putting on gloves to work with food; sewage/wastewater backed up through floor drains at a food prep area in the kitchen when the mop sink and hand washing sink were being used, and no paper towels, mechanical drying device or soap were provided at the hand washing sink.

The business was allowed to reopen May 20 after a follow-up inspection found the conditions that created a threat to public health and safety no longer existed. The manager could not be reached for comment.

Kebab Restaurant, 514 NE 167th Street, North Miami Beach was closed May 21 after an inspector observed violations that included: Foods held at improper temperatures; raw animal food stored over ready-to-eat food; a vacuum breaker was missing at a mop sink faucet and approximately 25 live roaches were found in the kitchen at a three-compartment sink.

The business was allowed to reopen May 22 after a follow-up inspection found the conditions that created a threat to public health and safety no longer existed. A manager could not be reached for comment.

The Crime & Safety blog reports on inspections of South Florida dining spots as the state pursues its goal to visit Florida’s 47,800 licensed restaurants.

If you're going out to eat, search our restaurant databases before you leave home.

The state says it's not the number of violations that will cause a restaurant to be temporarily shut down, but rather the nature of what an inspector finds that merits closing a business.

After a restaurant is shuttered, an inspector typically visits again within 24 hours and continues to visit until violations are resolved and the business can reopen. Repeat critical violations can lead to fines in a future administrative complaint levied by the state.

If a bad dining experience makes you feel ill, it’s easy to complain to the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation by calling 850-487-1395 or by filing a report online at MyFloridaLicense.com.  But beware: that’s not the place for personal vendettas. False reports can lead to misdemeanor charges.

And if you haven’t checked out a bistro’s inspection history online before making a reservation, state law requires restaurants to provide customers with a copy.