Riverside rowhome accidentally knocked down

Hollins Market

Low-income renters in Baltimore become migrants in their own city

Low-income renters in Baltimore become migrants in their own city

When the furnace in their West Baltimore rowhouse broke last winter, Denise and Marvin Jones did what they could to keep their family warm — and together. They filed a complaint against their landlord. They boiled pots of water and ran space heaters. They sent their four children to bed bundled in coats, hats and gloves.

"I didn't want to separate them," Denise said, crying. But "it was so cold."

The family split up in January, fanning out to the heated homes of different relatives across the city even as they continued to pay the $950 monthly rent at their own cold home. They sometimes checked in to motels just to spend a few nights together.

But...

64°