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White Nose Syndrome

White Nose Syndrome
Biologists and veterinary pathologists from Vermont to Minnesota are desperately scrambling to discover the cause of the fungus that is killing bats in record numbers.
Biologists and veterinary pathologists from Vermont to Minnesota are desperately scrambling to discover the cause of the fungus that is killing bats in record numbers. « Show less

Top White Nose Syndrome Articles see all

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  • Western Maryland wind project faces limits to protect bats, birds

    Western Maryland wind project faces limits to protect bats, birds
    Maryland's first industrial-scale wind energy project would be required under a federal plan issued Monday to slow down its turbines at certain times of the year to reduce the number of endangered bats that might be killed by the long, spinning blades.
  • Bats have their benefits

    Bats have their benefits
    Editor: After reading your recent article onbats reported at apartment complexes in Aberdeen, for the sake of balance in your paper as well as the ecosystem, please publish thatbats come with benefits too. Bats eat tons of mosquitos, preventing the...

    Fungus causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers find

     
    Researchers say they now have proof that a fungus discovered in 2007 is responsible for white-nose syndrome, the devastating infectious disease that has killed more than 1 million bats in North America. The confirmation is a significant step toward...

    Rare bats, battered by white-nose syndrome, may warrant endangered species protection

     
    Bats may warrant endangered species status because of white nose syndrome, which is killing bats.

    Colorado caves opened despite threat to bats

     
    "Bat biologists are saying a human-caused jump of white-nose syndrome into the western United States could be absolutely devastating, so why are some federal land managers taking the risk and leaving caves open?”