Chuck McIntosh (21) was the "go-to guy"  in the red zone for Parkland's 2002 state title team

Parkland High School 's #21, Chuck McIntosh, right, runs with the ball during the first quarter of their PIAA State Championship Football game at Hersheypark Stadium in Hershey, PA Saturday, December 7, 2002, as Woodland Hills #25, Darian Cochran, left attempts the tackle. They are playing Woodland Hills High School near Pittsburg, PA. (MIKE KUBEL/TMC) ***** PIAA 4A state football championship ***** (Michael Kubel / TMC / December 7, 2002)

Chuck McIntosh, a key member of Parkland's 2002 state championship football team as a receiver, died earlier this week in West Virginia. He was just 29. He went out for a walk with his dog and was found lying face down in the street.

But the story is even more tragic than that.

McIntosh has very little family and there is a fundraising effort going on, driven by his Parkland teammates, to help give him a proper burial.

Here's the website for those interested in donating: http://www.gofundme.com/d7l0v4

Rob Melosky, who was the head coach on that 2002 state championship team, said McIntosh was "a great kid."

"Chucky was a coachable kid and a great teammate," Melosky said. "Everybody liked him. And the thing about him is that whenever the ball was throw his way that season, he caught it. He didn't drop a pass all season."

Melosky said McIntosh's biggest catch came in the PIAA 4A semifinals against North Penn.

"We had a fourth-and-1 and Chuck wanted the ball," Melosky said. "He ran a quick slant, we got the touchdown and we were on our way."

Michael Glass, one of McIntosh's teammates and a current Nazareth assistant, also has many fond memories of him.

"Chuck was the guy who kept the locker room loose," Glass said. "He would loosen things up when things were a little tense. He would always joke around and never had a negative word to say about anyone. He wasn't one of the guys who just hung out with football players. He was active within the entire school.

"He had various groups of friends and everyone took care of him, everyone loved him. Everyone would give him rides. Everyone knew he had a rough life growing up, so everyone took him in. He became one of our brothers."

Glass said that he has been in contact with many of his teammates in the past 24 hours and they're trying to rally around him one more time.

"There has been a lot of stuff on Facebook and we're reliving many good memories as we talk about Chuck," Glass said. "He was a very good player. He was our go-to guy in the red zone. We could always count on him. He was always there for us. Now we want to be there for him. He's really, really going to be missed."

Glass said the last time he saw McIntosh was two years ago when the team held a 10-year anniversary for its big moment.

"Everything seemed fine then," Glass said. "This is such a tragedy."