A top civilian aide to Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca was relieved of duty and is now the subject of an internal affairs investigation after the department learned that he owns a South Los Angeles property that houses a medical marijuana shop, according to a department spokesman.

Bishop Edward R. Turner worked as a paid field deputy for Baca and  oversaw the department’s Multi-Faith Clergy Council for more than decade. Bishop is the  founder of Power of Love Christian Fellowship ministries.

He was relieved of duty by Baca on Tuesday evening after the department learned from  KABC-TV Channel 7 that a nonprofit he operates had its tax status revoked and a medical marijuana shop is being operated on his property, sheriff’s spokesman Steve Whitmore said.

“An internal affairs investigation has been launched into the Bishop Turner. This is first the sheriff had heard of these allegations,” Whitmore said.

Turner did not immediately return calls for comment.

 According to public records, Turner owns a property at 1425 West Manchester Ave. That property is the listed address for Manchester Caregivers, which describes itself as a marijuana dispensary that offers cannabis brownies, fudge cookies, ice cream, THC candies and smoking accessories to those with medical marijuana prescriptions.

Charity records show that Turner served as chairman and founder of the Helping Our People Excel for Life Foundation, a nonprofit community group.  Federal records indicate that the organization had its charity status revoked after failing to file tax returns  for three years. Its last filing on record with the IRS was in 2009, according to the Guidestar charity monitoring group. For 2009, the organization’s 990-EZ shows a total revenue of $8,298 and expenses of $44,969 with net assets of -$315.244. according to a filing in August 2010.

Turner served as a Baca field deputy for 14 years.

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