The electro-rock antagonists Liars, Denmark's doomy post-punks Iceage and the Australian dance act Miami Horror will headline the main bill this year's Filter Magazine Culture Collide Festival in Echo Park on Oct. 9-12.

But be sure to read the fine print, local music fans. You'll have to buy a different ticket to a separate show if you want to see the acts listed at the top of the poster: Phoenix and Dinosaur Jr.

The annual Echo Park fair Culture Collide has become a popular neighborhood staple, where one cheap wristband gets you into a whole neighborhood's worth of shows at local venues and outdoor pavilions. Past shows have included sets from Black Lips and Zola Jesus, among many others.

This year's lineup will also feature fuzz-poppers the Raveonettes, much-touted post-hardcore group The Men and UK soulstress Alice Russell, among many others. Wristbands for the main fest are currently onsale for $20 through June 16 (prices rise to $30 afterward). 

PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times

But one show that wristband will not get you into, however, is the one that the two acts atop the poster are playing.

Fresh off a top-billed Coachella set, the dapper French pop-rock group Phoenix will play its own separate headlining arena gig  -- or "Culture Collide Kick Off Show," as the fest puts it -- at the L.A. Sports Arena on Oct. 9, with the classic-indie shredders Dinosaur Jr. in tow. 

Tickets to that "Culture Collide Kick Off Show" will go on-sale June 7 for $39.50-$49.50.

So, in short -- Echo Park fans of Liars, Iceage and Raveonettes, your show is $20 and onsale now. Fans of Phoenix and Dinosaur Jr. -- your show is at the L.A. Sports Arena, goes on sale June 7 and is $39.50-$49.50.

Neither ticket will also get you into the other show for free. So to avoid unexpected culture collisions of another kind at the door, make sure you buy the one you're looking for. 

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