Tuskegee Airmen fought on many battlefields, foreign and domestic yet were under acknowledged and under appreciated. As the surviving Tuskegee Airmen were saluted by their newest Commander-in-Chief, President Barack Obama, riding past his Inaugural reviewing stand on January 20, 2009, they were smiling and rose up as proudly as if their now frailer bodies had slipped off the bonds of time. It's time to recall for a new generation the regard we have for these ageless warriors and all those who sent them aloft --to see them as the young gallant men and women who proudly went to war for us all and became our heroes of WWII.

The overarching story of the Tuskegee Airmen has been told on film and in countless publications including how it began: On October 15, 1939 Frederick D. Patterson, President of Tuskegee Institute received a letter from the Civil Aeronautics Authority designating the school as the lynchpin of a new Negro civilian pilot training program. This was a precursor to the establishment of the program that produced the pilots, ground crew and training staff that contributed to the success of the Tuskegee Airmen.

June 4, 2009-November 1, 2009

California African-American Museum; 600 State Dr. Exposition Park

Free Admission

For more information call 213-744-7432 or visit www.caamuseum.org