A struggling economy and low ridership have Dallas Area Rapid Transit creating new sources of revenue.

This week, DART's Board of Directors reversed a longtime advertising policy to allow beer and wine ads on its buses and trains.

DART Spokesperson Mark Ball said, "It wasn't even something that was discussed in the past. When it was suggested that we could make anywhere from 200 to 400 thousand dollars a year, the board decided that was something we needed to consider."

Similar advertising policies are in place by many other major cities, including Fort Worth.

"The committee looked at the proposal for alcohol sales," Ball said, "and, orginally, some were opposed to it completely."

DART'S Board of Directors compromised by allowing the ads to be placed on buses and trains, but not at bus stops or train stations.

Dallas resident Ursula Lister and her son, Maleek, ride trains everyday.

"I know they have to make money, but I wish they wouldn't do it. I think it would influence the kids more if they advertise it. Especially, if they are already leaning that way as far as drinking."

DART Rider Melton Hibbler agreed, "If we already have areas that have other social issues, encouraging more drinking in those areas is probably not the best thing. Anytime they advertise something, there's more of it."

DART riders aren't the only ones concerned by the new ads.

Friday, Mothers Against Drunk Driving weighed in on the change saying, "The concerns MADD raises in regards to alcohol advertising include the content of the ads and their intended audience. While MADD is not against adults over age 21 drinking alcohol, we encourage DART to also consider running ads containing alcohol-related safety messages."

Ball said, "We have not had anybody approach us with alcohol sales yet, but we're now open to that opportunity since we now have permission to consider it."