Tiger Woods said Friday he is taking an indefinite leave from golf to try to save his marriage, the biggest fallout yet from two shocking weeks filled with allegations of rampant extramarital affairs.

"I need to focus my attention on being a better husband, father, and person," Woods said on his Web site.

Woods and his wife, Elin, have been married five years and have a 2-year-old daughter and a 10-month-old son.

The announcement came two weeks after Woods crashed his SUV into a tree outside his Florida home, setting in motion a stunning downfall for the world's No. 1 player who for 13 years rarely made news off the golf course. One woman who said she had a 31-month affair with Woods shared a voice mail that she said Woods left her two nights before his Nov. 27 accident.

"I am deeply aware of the disappointment and hurt that my infidelity has caused to so many people, most of all my wife and children," Woods said. "I want to say again to everyone that I am profoundly sorry and that I ask forgiveness. It may not be possible to repair the damage I've done, but I want to do my best to try."

Woods has not been seen in public since the accident.

He gave no indication when he might return in what could be a pivotal year as he pursues the record 18 major championships won by Jack Nicklaus. Woods, who did not win a major this year, has 14.

The Masters, where Woods has won four times, is April 8-11. The U.S. Open is at Pebble Beach, where Woods won by a record 15 strokes in 2000, and the British Open returns to St. Andrews, where he has won twice by a combined 13 shots.

It will be the second straight year that a PGA Tour season begins without its star player. A year ago, Woods was recovering from reconstructive knee surgery that kept him out a total of eight months.

This is different.

"We knew before he was coming back," said Steve Stricker, one of Woods' favorite players on tour. "Now, we're not sure when he's coming back. But this sounds good. I hope everything works out for him."

The PGA Tour supported the decision.

"His priorities are where they need to be, and we will continue to respect and honor his family's request for privacy," PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem said in a statement, the tour's first public comment since Woods mentioned his "personal failings" and "transgressions" in a Dec. 2 statement. "We look forward to Tiger's return to the PGA Tour when he determines the time is right for him."

Woods' agent, Mark Steinberg, told The Associated Press that it was the right decision for Woods and his family.

"The entirety of someone's life is more important than just a professional career," Steinberg said in an e-mail to the AP. "What matters most is a young family that is trying to cope with difficult life issues in a secluded and caring way. Whenever Tiger may return to the game should be on the family's terms alone."

Craig Parry, who played a practice round with Woods in Australia last month, said Woods brought the problems on himself.

"What he did was totally wrong," Parry said at the Australian PGA Championship. "And he's got no one to blame except himself. You can look at other people, but he's the one who's got to look in the mirror."

John Daly, who is going through his third divorce, said he has been trying to reach Woods and "he just didn't want to talk to anybody."

"I feel if there is anybody in this world who could give him some advice ..." Daly said in Australia. "I hope we get him back soon. They always say there is no one bigger in golf than the game itself. But Tiger is."