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Medical Research

A collection of news and information related to Medical Research published by this site and its partners.

Top Medical Research Articles

Displaying items 361-372
  • Mark Midei fights for medical license, exoneration

    Mark Midei fights for medical license, exoneration
    It took 25 years for Dr. Mark Midei to build his reputation and less than two for it to come crashing down. In the spring of 2009, he was a superstar cardiologist with a seven-figure salary and a staff that adored him. By late April 2011, he was...
  • More younger people getting colorectal cancer

    More younger people getting colorectal cancer
    Carol Carr showed all the signs of colorectal cancer seven years ago, but doctors thought the 44-year-old Glen Burnie woman was too young to have the disease and never tested her for it. Instead, they said her diarrhea, vomiting, cramping, iron...
  • New American Heart Association president driven by family history

    New American Heart Association president driven by family history
    It was 1985, and Gordon Tomaselli had graduated from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed his residency at the University of California at San Francisco. He was at a Boston hospital, interviewing for a possible fellowship, when he got the...
  • New study scrutinizes heart stent procedures

    New study scrutinizes heart stent procedures
    A new study of more than 500,000 cardiac patients who underwent recent cardiac stent or angioplasty procedures in the United States has found that up to 15 percent were either unnecessary or appeared to be of uncertain medical benefit. However, nearly...
  • Diets suggested for more pregnant women

    Diets suggested for more pregnant women
    Before Aiesha Eddins got pregnant, she didn't give much thought to her diet. "I ate whatever," said the 27-year-old Owings Mills woman. "We ordered take-out." But when she weighed in at 220 pounds during her initial prenatal visit, she quickly earned...
  • Gene patent case could impact patients, research

    Gene patent case could impact patients, research
    Every time a woman is tested for gene mutations linked to significantly higher rates of breast and ovarian cancer, her blood is sent to a lab in Utah. That's because Salt Lake City-based Myriad Genetics Inc. owns the patents to the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2...
  • Death from marathon running low

    Death from marathon running low
    The stories of marathon runners collapsing and dying at the finish line are enough to scare anybody thinking of participating in one of the 26.2 mile races popular around this time of year. But a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers has found the...
  • Researchers eye saliva for patient testing

    Researchers eye saliva for patient testing
    No one likes to get stuck with a needle. But it's the only way doctors can get blood to test for diabetes, anemia and numerous other health problems. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing say there is a much less invasive and...
  • Hopkins researchers aim to uncover which mobile health applications work

    Hopkins researchers aim to uncover which mobile health applications work
    Those looking to lose weight, quit smoking or keep tabs on a malady have a lot of choices in the smartphone app stores. Choosing one that's beneficial is more of a problem. Science is still trying to catch up to the market for mobile health applications,...
  • New health issues tied to low-level lead exposure

    New health issues tied to low-level lead exposure
    Despite dramatic progress in reducing Americans' exposure to lead over the past 25 years, a growing body of research finds that children and adults still face health risks from even very low levels of the toxic metal in their blood. A recent government...
  • Teen sexual behavior changed little in a decade

    Teen sexual behavior changed little in a decade
    Strides made in the 90s to reduce risky sexual behavior among teens has largely plateaued, federal health data released today has found. The data from the Centers for Disease Control National Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that many teenagers are using...
  • Bacteria that caused flesh-eating infection more common than believed

    Bacteria that caused flesh-eating infection more common than believed
    The story of a 24-year-old Georgia graduate student fighting a flesh-eating disease has prompted a microbiologist with the Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System to speak out about the infection. Aimee Copeland lost most of her left leg after the...