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U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A collection of news and information related to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published by this site and its partners.

Top U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Articles

Displaying items 109-120
  • CDC lowers lead poisoning threshold

    CDC lowers lead poisoning threshold
    The number of young children deemed at risk of lead poisoning in Maryland and nationwide expanded drastically Wednesday as a federal health agency declared it would effectively cut in half its threshold for diagnosing the environmental illness....
  • Good morning, Baltimore: Need to know for Thursday

    Good morning, Baltimore: Need to know for Thursday
    WEATHER Today's forecast calls for sunny and breezy conditions, with a high temperature near 75 degrees. Tonight is expected to be clear, with a low temperature around 54 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you...
  • Maryland doctors probe old cases for lead exposure

    Maryland doctors probe old cases for lead exposure
    A day after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cut in half the threshold for determining lead exposure in the nation's children, pediatricians faced the task of identifying new cases from thousands of their old files. The...
  • We need a war on lead poisoning

    We need a war on lead poisoning
    The reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cut its threshold for lead poisoning from 10 micrograms per deciliter to 5 micrograms were something of a simplification. What the CDC said, after years of study and discussion, was that no...
  • Danger of lead demands vigilance

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's decision to lower the standard for blood lead toxicity to 5 micrograms per deciliter was based on accumulated evidence that even the lowest levels of lead have devastating effects on the developing...
  • New law helps schools cope with food allergies

    New law helps schools cope with food allergies
    Maryland public schools will all soon be keeping emergency supplies of epinephrine on hand for students who may have an allergic reaction, and patient advocates are applauding the new law. “Receiving a dose of epinephrine in the critical minutes...
  • Lyme disease tick study stirs dispute

    Lyme disease tick study stirs dispute
    Hundreds of Baltimore-area families have volunteered for a government study to spray their suburban yards with pesticide, which researchers hope can protect them from Lyme disease but that environmentalists warn is unsafe. The goal, federal and state...
  • Maryland confirms first hepatitis C case linked to arrested med tech

    Maryland confirms first hepatitis C case linked to arrested med tech
    Health officials in Maryland confirmed Monday the state's first hepatitis C case directly linked to traveling medical technician David Kwiatkowski, whose arrest by federal law enforcement officials in July in connection with a hepatitis C outbreak in...
  • Third meningitis case reported in Maryland

    Third meningitis case reported in Maryland
    Maryland health officials on Saturday announced a third patient has developed meningitis in the state after receiving a steroid injection in September. More cases were found across the country, bringing the total to more than 60. The person is alive, but...
  • Paid sick leave urged in Maryland

    Paid sick leave urged in Maryland
    Raquel Rojas has never worked for a company that gave her paid sick leave. Sometimes even unpaid leave isn't on offer. The Baltimore resident said a restaurant that employed her as a line cook three years ago stopped scheduling her for work after she...
  • CA youth fitness programs strive to put 'kids in action'

    With childhood obesity on the rise, Columbia's primary provider of health and fitness programs, the Columbia Association, is striving to combat the disease with a pair of fitness programs for children. The two pilot programs, YouthFit and Kids in Action,...
  • UM research paints more complicated picture of Haiti cholera outbreak

    UM research paints more complicated picture of Haiti cholera outbreak
    Cholera broke out in Haiti two years ago, and more than 7,000 people have died. Some researchers traced the outbreak's origin to United Nations peacekeepers sent from Nepal after the devastating earthquake in 2010. The theory that Nepalese soldiers...