Each day, the New London school board's special investigation into Terrence P. Carter's background has more ground to cover – as it emerged Tuesday that portions of his application essay for city school superintendent job were identical with the wording of articles published on the Internet.

The New London school board last Thursday put off its approval of an employment contract for Carter. Instead, it ordered its Hartford legal counsel to investigate issues first raised by the Courant, beginning with the July 18 disclosure that Carter used the titles of Dr. and Ph.D. for more than five years without holding a doctorate from an accredited university.

On Tuesday, major similarities surfaced between portions of an employment essay that Carter submitted as part of his application this past March for the top administrative job in the troubled New London school system and articles that others had written.

The Day of New London noted several passages. Here's an additional example:

Carter's application: "Excellent communications starts with relationships - strong, trusting relationships. I create and nurture these relationships with my key stakeholder groups, both internal and external; because these relationships are truly the lifeblood for building the support that I have so often needed in creating the educational reforms or making changes that otherwise might cause significant upset. Doing the right thing for students isn't always the popular thing…"

An article available on the Internet, "GETTING IT RIGHT -- Why Good School Communication Matters," by Jerry Weast, former superintendent of schools in Montgomery County, Maryland: "…excellent communications starts with relationships - strong, trusting relationships. You must create and nurture these relationships with your key stakeholder groups, both internal and external. Such relationships are truly the lifeblood for building support for educational reforms or making changes that otherwise might cause significant upset. Doing the right thing for students isn't always the popular thing…"

Carter's application: "My having these healthy relationships built on trust has lessened the negative impact of those decisions that initially made some of my stakeholders unhappy. A cache of good will makes it possible to create buy in on difficult decisions and assuage those who might otherwise start a way of protest."

Weast article: "Having healthy relationships built on trust can lessen the negative impact of those decisions that may make some of your stakeholders unhappy. A cache of good will makes it possible to create buy in on difficult decisions and assuage those who might otherwise start a way of protest."

The Day mentioned other wording from Weast that matched Carter's application essay.

The Courant has sent requests for comment to Carter, his New London Attorney, William F. McCoy, and Roxanne Jones of PUSH Marketing group, a public relations representative Carter brought with him to last week's Board of Education meeting in New London. None has yet replied.

In another development Tuesday, a state Department of Education official wrote Carter to say that his pending application for certification as a superintendent has been frozen. The department "will defer processing of your pending application for superintendent until such time as the New London Board of Education completes its investigation," wrote Nancy L. Pugliese, chief of the agency's bureau of educator standards and certification.

A series of damaging news disclosures led up to last Thursday's decision by the school board to have Shipman & Goodwin conduct an investigation into his background within 30 days. On Tuesday, attorney Saranne P. Murray of the firm would not comment on specifics of the investigation other than to say she expects it will take two or three weeks, so that the board can decide what action to take within the 30 days allotted.

State Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor had interviewed and endorsed Carter for superintendent after the New London school board voted in June to select him – but last Thursday, after nearly a week's worth of revelations, the state Department of Education asked Carter to withdraw from consideration.

Carter refused to withdraw, however, saying he had done nothing wrong, stood by his job application, and still wants the job.

Among the revelations that prompted Pryor's reversal last week was a national research organization's release to The Courant of a biography that it said Carter had submitted in 2011 for an education conference at which he was scheduled to speak. The bio included the assertion that Carter held a Ph.D. from Stanford University, which Stanford says is untrue.

Carter had previously said he never claimed to have a Stanford degree, and that he'd never misrepresented his credentials – but he has declined comment on the bio that the American Institutes for Research released to The Courant last week.

The Day's article Tuesday cited other paragraphs of Carter's application essay and published articles that were close in their wording – including this pair:

Carter's application: "During the 2012-2013 school year, our network received $20,217 in donations. The money goes into the general fund. Because these elective absence penalties or donations are working, this may become a more widespread tool for our schools to increase revenues."

A 2010 article on the website Investopedia about a school district in California: "During the 2008-2009 school year, this district received $20,217 in donations. The money goes into the district's general fund. Because these elective absence penalties or donations are working, this may become a more widespread tool for schools to increase revenues."

Until two weeks ago Carter had appeared headed for an Aug. 1 start as superintendent in New London, where the schools have had such low performance ratings that the state education department decided to install a "special master," former Hartford schools superintendent Steven Adamowski, to oversee the system.