Weight Can Be A Touchy Subject For Female Athletes

Her answer was to change her diet. She dropped 10 pounds. She said she had lifted weights so much in college, she gained muscle weight. She played at 155 pounds at UConn. After she graduated, she maintained it. Ultimately, she leaned her diet. She stopped lifting as much. In 2011, she played at 145 pounds.

"If I were to talk to an elite high school athlete and they asked me, 'How can I get to the next level?' I'd say conditioning is No. 1. If you can run faster longer or longer faster, if you can do things at the end of the game as well after playing 30 minutes, that's when you can last in this league."

"I'm open about it," Bird said that night. "I refer to my fat days very fondly."

Mosqueda-Lewis, Zimmerman observed, seems to have added a few pounds since last year and thought it has slowed her. KML said she lifted a lot during the summer and preseason. She freely says she got bigger. She is not buying slower.

"The coaches said they wanted to post me up more this year," KML said. "They want me to be one of the leading rebounders. It's really important for me to be bigger. Tonight I had to guard one of their bigger post players, so it helped."

No, I didn't ask her how much she weighs. I didn't ask Lobo in 1995 or Bird in 2011. I still don't want to be rude.

"[Listing weights] is one of those things that never have been done," said Meghan Culmo, the SNY analyst who also played on the first Final Four team. "But at this point, it might be an oversight as much as anything."

"Women's players now, versus to when I played, I don't think they give a [darn] anymore. Being bigger is more acceptable now."

And then Culmo paused for a moment, gave thought to the eating disorder and said, "Weight has always been a weird thing for women."

Or they could just do what a lot of male athletes do. Fib about their weight.

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