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(August 12, 2013)

We love our trees here in Connecticut. That’s why the emerald ash borer is an issue and no joke. I’ll do what I can to spread the word. It’s amazing how a tiny insect about the size of a grain of rice can bring down a majestic ash tree as big as an oak. This bug reminds me of another Asian invader, the hemlock woolly adelgid that has killed thousands of hemlock trees in the Northeast.

 

Some invasive species like the pythons in the Florida Everglades can instill fear just at the thought, but a bug? Sure, the deer tick is scary, but it’s not invasive. It’s a native. The borer is from Michigan, also by way of Asia. It was found in Connecticut only last year in Prospect and three other towns and it has already spread. You may recall we tried to contain it in 2012 by prohibiting the transfer of firewood.

 

Ash trees are considered a sacred tree by the druids and practitioners of Wicca and Witchcraft. Oars were made from ash to protect against drowning. Their shamans made wands out of ash wood. I’m no expert on Harry Potter characters, but I know one of Ron Weasely’s wands is made of ash. I looked it up. Ironic that a sacred tree could be killed by a lowly insect, so the emerald ash borer must possess powerful juju. No wonder it’s so hard to stop.