South Carolina State University

Scientists, volunteers flock to eclipse path to conduct research, or just bask in magnificence

Scientists, volunteers flock to eclipse path to conduct research, or just bask in magnificence

When the sun disappears behind the moon for a few minutes on Monday afternoon, Chris Hansen plans to be in South Carolina, ready to observe with a camera, a digital thermometer and some crickets he bought at Petco.

Myles McKay, an analyst at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, also plans to be in the Palmetto State, manning one of 68 telescopes stationed across the United States in a citizen science project to capture images of the haze of plasma that surrounds the sun during a total solar eclipse.

Thousands of miles away in Idaho, Matthew Knight hopes to use the darkness to scan for comets using just his eyes — covered by sun-filtering safety glasses when...

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