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Inorganic Chemical Industry

A collection of news and information related to Inorganic Chemical Industry published by this site and its partners.

Top Inorganic Chemical Industry Articles

Displaying items 1-12
  • Pesticides found in 'bee-friendly' garden-store plants

    Pesticides found in 'bee-friendly' garden-store plants
    Many supposedly bee-friendly flowers and home garden plants being sold by major retailers have been pretreated with pesticides implicated in bee declines, according to a study by Friends of the Earth and other organizations, including the Maryland...
  • Make sure pesticides don't harm helpful pollinators

    Make sure pesticides don't harm helpful pollinators
    How can I save pollinators like honeybees and still use pesticides when I need them? Some pesticides, such as horticultural oil or soap, are effective and have low impact on beneficial insects. Call the Home and Garden Information Center for tips on...
  • Boxwood blight means avoid mixing old and new plants

    Boxwood blight means avoid mixing old and new plants
    People with old boxwoods are being warned not to plant new boxwoods nearby, but what about those of us with no boxwoods who want some? They're so deer-resistant. The new and highly contagious boxwood blight disease has made it unwise, for the present,...
  • Is organic really worth it?

    Is organic really worth it?
    Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post. This week, Shanti Lewis, RD, CNSD, CSP, weighs in on organic food. Should you choose the organic strawberries versus conventional ones? Both are bright and...
  • Getting educated on GMOs

    Getting educated on GMOs
    Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is printed here. This week, Karen Kolowski weighs in on...
  • Pixelligent dreams big with minuscule particles

    Pixelligent dreams big with minuscule particles
    Your next smartphone screen or TV display might be brighter, the synthetic oil in your car might perform better and computer chips might be more durable — all thanks to minuscule particles that are starting to be manufactured in Baltimore....
  • A fly-by-night assault on mosquitoes

    The sun begins its descent toward distant pines as Paul Nuwer taxis the white, twin-engine turboprop plane onto Runway 3-4 at Cambridge Dorchester Municipal Airport. Nuwer revs the engines to 42,000 rpm, releases the brake and accelerates the aircraft to...
  • Open agapanthus pods to start seedlings

    Open agapanthus pods to start seedlings
    Question: Our agapanthus flowered well this year and now have green seed pods at the ends of many stems. Do you plant the entire pod or open them to grow more agapanthus? Answer: Agapanthus plantings, also known as lilies of the Nile, have flourished...
  • Is there a bee-apocalypse on the horizon?

     Is there a bee-apocalypse on the horizon?
    In recent months, I've been concerned about the level of credence being given to some reports covering honey bees and colony decline, especially those that claim that a bee-apocalypse is coming and that bees will most definitely be extinct within a few...
  • A lot is riding on finding culprit in honeybee deaths

    The following editorial appeared in the Sacramento Bee on Sunday, July 27: For more than a decade, scientists have been trying to solve the mystery of honeybees disappearing by the millions. There are many suspects, but one has become the focus of...
  • Study: Pesticide used on 'bee-friendly' plants may hurt bees

    Study: Pesticide used on 'bee-friendly' plants may hurt bees
    Many plants being marketed in nurseries and garden centers as beneficial to bees have been treated with an insecticide some scientists believe to be harmful to bee colonies, according to a study made public Wednesday by an environmental group. The study...
  • Native Birds Could Use A Helping Human Hand

    Native Birds Could Use A Helping Human Hand
    Spring birds are arriving in Connecticut. Eastern phoebes returned recently, and before the end of April we'll be seeing and hearing barn swallows, tree swallows and purple martins. Those four birds are among 17 species native to our state that eat only...