NORFOLK — Given its defensive shortcomings, Campbell's best option figured to be keeping Old Dominion's high-powered offense off the field.

The problem was, even that was not good enough.

Monarchs quarterback Taylor Heinicke directed three quick-strike scoring drives in the first half and Old Dominion made a little time of possession go a long way in a 42-14 victory at sold-out Ballard Stadium.

Despite having the ball for just over 19 of the game's 60 minutes, the Monarchs racked up 499 yards of offense and cruised to their fourth straight victory.

"I told my team we needed to bring some of my ex-teammates to play today," said Campbell coach Mike Minter, a former standout at Nebraska and a member of the Carolina Panthers' 2003 Super Bowl team. "We knew offensively they were very powerful. We knew they had some wide receivers. Their quarterback was very good. We were just trying to hold on."

Heinicke finished with 342 passing yards and three touchdowns in a little more than three quarters and Gerard Johnson ran for two scores for the Monarchs (8-3). Old Dominion, a Football Championship Subdivision independent this season transitioning to the FBS, improved to 7-0 against FCS programs.

Old Dominion thumped the Camels 70-14 when these teams met in Norfolk last season. Saturday's Campbell date was a late offseason replacement for Charlotte, which pulled out of its game contract with ODU.

With Campbell allowing nearly 40 points per game this year and the Monarchs having recorded 50 or more five times, the conditions seemed ripe for another Old Dominion points fest.

Ball control kept the Camels competitive early, though. Campbell maintained possession for more than 23 minutes in the first half — and 41:50 for the game — including 7:29 on the game's opening drive.

"They did a good job of holding the ball, keeping it out of our hands," Heinicke said. "Credit to Campbell."

Campbell's opening series ended with a 2-yard touchdown run by Keith Goss. But that was the only first-half drive the Camels finished as Old Dominion blocked two field-goal attempts and continued to stiffen whenever the Camels threatened.

"We haven't had a kick blocked all year," Minter said. "ODU would start pushing and when they jumped, they were about seven feet tall. It had nothing to do with protection. It had nothing to do with breakdowns. They were just bigger and better at making the play."

The Monarchs, meanwhile, made the most of their limited time with the ball. Johnson's 5-yard TD run midway through the first quarter to tie the game capped a drive that took just 2:39. Heinicke's 47-yard scoring strike to Antonio Vaughan finished off a three-play series that used up just 1:06.

Late in the first half, the Monarchs covered three plays in just 34 seconds and used a 74-yard scoring pass from Heinicke to Larry Pinkard to take a 21-7 lead into halftime.

Heinicke opened the second half with his third TD pass of the day, a 19-yarder to a wide-open Vaughan. Johnson followed with a 10-yard scoring run to make it 35-7.

With 5:13 remaining, Vaughan found the end zone for the third time on a 64-yard strike from backup quarterback David Washington.

Brian Hudson passed for 278 yards with a touchdown to lead Campbell (2-9), which pushed around the Monarchs' defense at times en route to 422 offensive yards. Old Dominion coach Bobby Wilder said a similar defensive effort simply will not cut it next week when the Monarchs visit North Carolina in their season finale.

"This was clearly not a complete effort as a football team," Wilder said. "I certainly don't want to take anything away from Campbell and Coach Minter, but ... we'll need to be a lot more competitive, especially on defense, going down to North Carolina."

Notes: Hudson became Campbell's all-time single-season passing leader, eclipsing Braden Smith. Smith threw for 1,965 yards in 2011. Hudson has 2,024 yards this season. ... The victory allowed Old Dominion to end its home schedule with a 6-0 record at Ballard Stadium, marking the Monarchs' first unbeaten season at home since restarting its program in 2009.