Problem Solver updates: Cable buried, free parking halted

AT&T has buried its cable, and with it former employee Ed Spletzer's rift with the company. Meanwhile, Chicago has ended free motorcycle parking in one Loop spot.

Ed Spletzer's roller-coaster relationship with AT&T is back on the ascent.

The Lake Barrington resident, who retired from the telecommunications giant in 1990 after 34 years of work, was featured in the June 16 What's Your Problem? column that described his ongoing effort to get AT&T to bury a cable in his backyard.

At the time, Spletzer wasn't sure which hurt more, the fact he couldn't get the line buried, or his former employer's seemingly cavalier attitude toward his situation.

After the Problem Solver inquired about the case, AT&T sent a crew out to assess the issue.

On June 18, workers began digging a trench for the cable, and on Thursday they completed their work.

An ecstatic Spletzer emailed that morning with an update.

"Although AT&T is still tidying up, the temporary cable across our patio has been removed and successfully buried," he wrote.

Spletzer, who is still proud to say he worked at AT&T, said he was glad it all worked out.

"It's almost as if the present AT&T captured a spark from the old AT&T I used to work for," he said.

Spot remover

There will be no more free motorcycle parking on Randolph Street near State Street.

Last week, city crews erected a "tow zone" sign at the intersection, making it illegal to park in the previously unmarked area where Loreen Targos and others had been leaving their motorcycles for months.

The Problem Solver first wrote about Targos in September, when the Loop resident began receiving tickets for parking her 1996 Honda VT 600 in the space.

In the past year, she received 53 tickets, all but two of which were thrown out by administrative law judges. Targos said she has appealed the two tickets.

After the Problem Solver wrote about the issue, other motorcycles began to be parked there as well. At times there were up to 10 motorcycles parked in the un-metered area.

Targos said she isn't upset that the city removed the free spots.

"I had been saying all along, if they're going to ticket me relentlessly, could they please find ONE ordinance that I am violating?" she wrote in an email. "Now that they've put up a sign, I appreciate knowing that that spot is prohibited, and I have moved my vehicle accordingly. I wish I could give THEM a ticket for NOT having a sign posted, as required in the ordinance they cited me for, yet ticketing me as if there WAS one posted."

Targos said she thinks the sign prohibiting parking in the area is unnecessary but she will abide by it.

She remains one step ahead of the city.

"By chance, I actually found another spot that's just as close," she said. "I haven't been ticketed there yet."

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