Stingray Tracking Device

State's highest court allows stingray evidence in murder case

State's highest court allows stingray evidence in murder case

Maryland’s highest court has ruled that cellphone evidence gathered by a controversial tracking device can be used against a man accused in a 2014 killing in Northwest Baltimore.

The Maryland Court of Appeals this week reversed lower court rulings that had suppressed that evidence in the case against Robert Copes. Copes, 40, is charged with killing Ina Jenkins, 34.

“We’re very disappointed in the court’s ruling,” said Copes’ attorney, Brandon Mead.

A trial date has not been scheduled.

Jenkins’ burned body was found Feb. 4, 2014, behind a vacant building in the 4000 block of Penhurst Ave. Police said Copes killed Jenkins in his apartment across the...

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