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Marylanders well represented in national African-American museum

Marylanders well represented in national African-American museum

WASHINGTON — Although their paths crossed more than two centuries ago, Benjamin Banneker — a free black Marylander — and Thomas Jefferson, the nation's third president — were not considered equals because of slavery.

Yet inside the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, life-sized figures of the two countrymen stand next to each other in the History Gallery, flanked by fellow icons.

Nearby is a stack of 609 bricks etched with names of the enslaved men, women and children that Jefferson owned in his lifetime. On a wall is the famous phrase from the Declaration of Independence — "all men are created equal" — which Jefferson largely...

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