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Trine Tsouderos

Trine Tsouderos is a reporter for the Chicago Tribune.
Trine Tsouderos is a reporter for the Chicago Tribune. « Show less

Top Trine Tsouderos Articles

Displaying items 25-36
  • Study's doctors have had their share of troubles

    More than a dozen physicians involved with the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy have run into trouble with federal regulators, state medical boards and even, in some cases, the law: •Dr. L. Terry Chappell, testified at Rep. Dan Burton's 1999...
  • Federal center pays good money for suspect medicine

    Federal center pays good money for suspect medicine
    Thanks to a $374,000 taxpayer-funded grant, we now know that inhaling lemon and lavender scents doesn't do a lot for our ability to heal a wound. With $666,000 in federal research money, scientists examined whether distant prayer could heal AIDS. It could...
  • Energy healing sparks debate

    Energy healing sparks debate
    Energy healers say they can detect and channel a "universal energy" and even manipulate this energy within another person. Science has not proved that this energy exists, that anybody can detect it or manipulate it, or that it has anything to do with...
  • How we got details on questionable federal health research funding (You can look, too)

    How we got details on questionable federal health research funding (You can look, too)
    On Sunday and Monday of this week, we published a series examining 12 years of spending at one of the centers at the National Institutes of Health -- the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, also known as NCCAM. Sen. Tom Harkin...
  • Long on decline, whooping cough makes a comeback

    Long on decline, whooping cough makes a comeback
    Hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. -- many of them children -- were coming down with whooping cough each year when vaccines against "this menace," as one newspaper called it, were introduced in the 1930s and 1940s. "Childhood Cough Is Given...
  • Whooping cough facts

    Whooping cough facts
    Whooping cough, or pertussis, infects babies, children and adults and looks a lot like the common cold at first — runny nose, sneezing and a mild cough or fever, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After one to two...
  • Our whooping cough story, and why medical reporting is so interesting

    Our whooping cough story, and why medical reporting is so interesting
    One especially fascinating aspect of my job is sifting through medical history, something I was more than happy to do for my story on the resurgence of reported cases of whooping cough in Illinois and across the nation. You can find that story, which...
  • Letters: Many views of 'alternative' treatment

    Letters: Many views of 'alternative' treatment
    The recent series of articles by Trine Tsouderos in the Los Angeles Times misrepresents the scientific contributions and future research agenda of the National Institutes of Health and its National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ["New...
  • Killer bird flu? What's behind the controversy over bird flu research

    Killer bird flu? What's behind the controversy over bird flu research
    "Engineered Doomsday." "Mutant Bird Flu." These may sound like the names of disaster movies, but they are headlines on recent news reports about experiments involving the H5N1 influenza virus. The H5N1 virus is known as a "bird flu" because it mainly...
  • Tracking hospital infections

    Ten years ago, Dr. Bob Chase would have laughed if someone had told him common infections could be eliminated in hospitals' intensive care units. "I would have said that's ridiculous, not possible," he said. "As a physician, I was trained to believe...
  • Questioning Dr. Oz

    Dr. Mehmet Oz is known as "America's Doctor," and it's not much of a stretch. Though he is a medical specialist -- an acclaimed cardiac surgeon -- Oz offers health information on just about any topic, from diet to child care to sex, through a...
  • Autism therapies can get undeserved credit

    Sara DiFucci says she vividly remembers the day a pediatrician said her daughter, then a preschooler, could wind up in a group home later in life. She was devastated. "I thought my daughter was going to get married and go to college," DiFucci said. "That...