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Library of Congress

A collection of news and information related to Library of Congress published by this site and its partners.

Top Library of Congress Articles

Displaying items 37-48
  • Paul McCartney on (the topic of) drugs

    Paul McCartney on (the topic of) drugs
    The Library of Congress is full of wonderful treasures, and today it released a new chestful: a collection of interviews on topics such as sex, drugs and rock and roll. Included is Paul McCartney relating how pot and other drugs boosted the Beatles'...
  • Kingsolver, Hosseini, Atwood headline National Book Festival

    Kingsolver, Hosseini, Atwood headline National Book Festival
    The Library of Congress released today the list of speakers for the fall National Book Festival, and, as usual, the event is studded with prominent writers and poets. Among the headliners: Margaret Atwood, Baltimore's own Taylor Branch, Don DeLillo,...
  • Reenactors drudge up Laurel's rugged Civil War past

    Reenactors drudge up Laurel's rugged Civil War past
    Nowadays, the "bink" of metal softball bats from the softball diamond is about the loudest noise heard near American Legion Post 60 in Laurel. But it wasn't always that way. Around 150 years ago, it was commonplace for residents to hear the "boom"...
  • With 'Appalachian Spring' Baltimore School for the Arts breaks new ground

    With 'Appalachian Spring' Baltimore School for the Arts breaks new ground
    If there is a single work that captures the essence of America in sound and movement, it's "Appalachian Spring," the ballet with music by Aaron Copland and choreography by Martha Graham that premiered in 1944 at the Library of Congress. Although the...
  • Everyone's life is a story, so write it down for posterity [Senior Circles]

    The inspiration for this column came from a local newspaper article I read about a "girl" with whom I went to high school for two years at St. Cecilia's Academy in Washington, D.C.   This woman, whom I haven't seen since then, has always kept a low...
  • Today's classical music comes to Columbia

    Today's classical music comes to Columbia
    You can expect the music to sound fresh during the Leipzig String Quartet's concert on Saturday, March 2, at 8 p.m., in Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. Like the sponsoring Candlelight Concert Society, this chamber music quartet often likes to...
  • Back-to-back book festivals coming this fall

    Back-to-back book festivals coming this fall
    Book lovers in the Baltimore-Washington area should circle September on their calendars, to save dates for a pair of big festivals. The Library of Congress National Book Festival will be held Sept. 21 and 22 on the mall in Washington. The event always...
  • The History Channel earns huge ratings with 'The Bible'

    The History Channel earns huge ratings with 'The Bible'
    The networks might be struggling on Sunday nights but not basic cable's the History Channel. The miniseries beat everything in sight Sunday night with record ratings for "The Bible." I think this quote from executive producers Roma Downey and Mark...
  • U.S. Senate Democrats to meet in Annapolis

    U.S. Senate Democrats will hold their annual retreat beginning Tuesday in Annapolis, giving lawmakers a chance to strategize about gun control, immigration and the latest fiscal crisis. The meeting, which will end with a closed-door address Wednesday by...
  • Letters and maps tell history of Laurel during Civil War

    Letters and maps tell history of Laurel during Civil War
    Although no battles were fought in Laurel during the Civil War, the city's railroad was a strategic resource for the Union Army, numerous units of Union soldiers were stationed here and the military's presence added a different element to the city's...
  • Norman Henley, teacher

    Norman Henley, teacher
    Norman Henley, a retired Russian-language and world literature teacher and academic editor, died of congestive heart failure at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 96 and had earlier lived in Remington and Charles Village. Born in...
  • Daylight savings wasn't always the norm

    It took a few tries to get daylight savings time to stick in the U.S. Benjamin Franklin estimated the idea would have saved 1 million francs per year in candles as a French diplomat in 1784, according to a report in the Library of Congress. The U.S....