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Barbara Brotman

Barbara Brotman
Barbara Brotman is a writer for the metropolitan news section's special projects team and the paper's Outdoors Adviser columnist.

Her 2006 stories chronicling the finals months of hospice care for a retired Chicago insurance executive won a distinguished writing award from the American Society of Newspaper Editors, honorable mention in the National Press Club Awards and a Best Feature award from the Chicago Journalists Association.

She was a columnist and staff writer for the weekly Woman News section from February 1994 to August 2003. From September 2003 to June 2004, she held a John S. Knight Fellowship at Stanford University.

She joined the Tribune in February 1...
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Barbara Brotman is a writer for the metropolitan news section's special projects team and the paper's Outdoors Adviser columnist.

Her 2006 stories chronicling the finals months of hospice care for a retired Chicago insurance executive won a distinguished writing award from the American Society of Newspaper Editors, honorable mention in the National Press Club Awards and a Best Feature award from the Chicago Journalists Association.

She was a columnist and staff writer for the weekly Woman News section from February 1994 to August 2003. From September 2003 to June 2004, she held a John S. Knight Fellowship at Stanford University.

She joined the Tribune in February 1978, writing for features sections and the Tempo section. After moving to the metropolitan news section as a general assignment reporter in 1982, she wrote the "About the Town" column for the Tribune from January 1984 until August 1989, for which she won a UPI International Award for Illinois Newspapers for Column Writing and a Peter Lisagor Award for column writing, given by Sigma Delta Chi, the Society of Professional Journalists. She then covered the abortion issue from both a local and national perspective. In April 1990 she rejoined the Tempo staff as a feature writer.

She received honorable mention in 2002 from the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors, and is also a past recipient of the Chicago Tribune's award for Outstanding Professional Performance, for her evocative writing style and ability to capture the mood and feel of Chicago life and people.

Brotman was born in New York and graduated from Queens College. Brotman, her husband, Chicago Tribune photographer Chuck Berman, and their two daughters live in Oak Park, Ill.
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Top Barbara Brotman Articles

Displaying items 13-24
  • Explore nature as a work in progress at Midewin

    With summer still splendid, and all the more precious as it wanes, it's time for a big outing to a big wilderness. Things don't get much bigger than the 18,000-acre Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, so my friend Joanna and I headed down to the former...
  • Ponds: Where science and serenity meet

    Dragonflies flitting over a quiet pond in the midday heat. A classic rural scene of summer, no? Actually, no. Classic, yes, but not just rural. The city and its environs have plenty of ponds, or pond equivalents, with the attendant dragonflies and...
  • Top 5 hikes in the Chicago area

    What better way to celebrate National Trails Day on Saturday, the American Hiking Society's annual celebration of the country's trails, than to go out on one? Here are my top picks for a nice hike, by category: Solitude Beverly Lake/Spring Creek...
  • Cure those fall blahs with a color paddle down the Kish

    The secret to a fall color paddling trip is flexibility and preparation. Flexibility, because you have to be ready to drop everything for a perfect day. Which, for a fall canoe trip, means a day at the peak of the color season but unseasonably warm and...
  • Lose yourself in isolated Visitation Prairie

    Nothing beats a good walk in the woods. You get the restorative contentment of cherishing nature. You get a good walk. And you get away from crowds in a way that only your feet -- which can navigate the narrowest trails and the thickest thickets -- can...
  • Starved Rock stars waterfalls, wet winter means more falls to visit

    A first outing of spring is the perfect time to express gratitude for the season's arrival. And this year, my feelings of gratitude are so intense that I needed a pretty spectacular piece of outdoors to express it. I figured that an 80-foot waterfall...
  • Fallout from Great Depression: 2 prairies

    You have to love the sidewalks. They are neatly laid out in right angles, a conventional concrete grid that would fit in perfectly in the most cookie cutter of suburban subdivisions.Except that there is no subdivision. The sidewalks stretch out into...
  • Rent a canoe and paddle through Northbrook on the Des Plaines River

    Have you gazed down from a bridge at a narrow ribbon of river and wished you could plop a canoe onto it and paddle off into the woods? It's hard to do if you don't own a canoe. But Ralph Frese, the legendary Pied Piper of Chicago canoeing, owns canoes --...
  • Best of Palos: Locals will moan, but our maps point the way to 3 great hikes

    Are you flummoxed by the Palos region? Maybe you have driven south on Mannheim Road and wondered who stole a piece of Minnesota and its lakes and plunked it down around the Calumet-Sag Channel.Maybe you have wanted to try hiking or biking in the...
  • The former Ft. Sheridan, now a public nature spot on Lake Michigan

    It's not Christmas, and it's not Chicago's birthday. So what's with the great big gift that has just been plunked down on our proverbial doorstep? Look at it, all wrapped in forest and swooping goldfinches: a huge chunk of undeveloped lakefront land...
  • President John F. Kennedy's assassination

    President John F. Kennedy's assassination
    On this day, a Friday, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a motorcade through Dallas. Chicago froze in horror, the moment sealed in memories people would carry for the rest of their lives. Office workers on their lunch hours when...
  • Marshall Field moves to State Street

    Marshall Field moves to State Street
    Crowds packed the sidewalks and streets on this date to watch Chicago's high society pour into Marshall Field's first store on State Street, a grand marble edifice with Corinthian columns. As was frequently the case, Marshall Field was on hand to...