Director William Friedkin comes home

“Are you doing a Q-and-A tonight?” the man asked.

“'Til they throw me out,” Friedkin said. “Ask me a good question — unlike some people.”

I looked up from my notebook and realized Friedkin was staring at me, grinning. The young man stepped off.

An old man stepped up.

Friedkin's eyes went wide.

“Yeah!” the man screamed. They hugged, kissed, embraced. He was Morry Loed. He used to be an actor for Friedkin; he brought a playbill of a stage production that Friedkin wrote and directed ages ago, at a theater on 53rd Street. They hadn't seen each other in 40 years. He told Friedkin he was 84, and back when Friedkin told him he was moving to Hollywood, he didn't believe it. Friedkin laughed and asked what Loed is doing now.

“Ah, well I'm retired now, of course,” Loed said.

“Well, and I'm not,” Friedkin said. “I am never (expletive) retiring. Never!”

Friedkin in person
William Friedkin will discuss his memoir, “The Friedkin Connection,” 6 p.m. Tuesday at Harold Washington Library Center, 400 S. State St.

cborrelli@tribune.com | Twitter @borrelli

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