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More construction slated for Glendale railway corridor

Glendale plans to begin construction on two railroad crossings in the San Fernando Road corridor in March, continuing a years-long effort to create a section of railway in which trains won’t have to blow their horns.

Pushed by residential noise complaints, Glendale officials have been working on improving several railroad crossings, a necessary step before the city can apply for a so-called “quiet zone” from the Federal Railroad Administration.

Once all the crossings have adequate safety improvements approved by federal transportation officials, engineers could stop honking their horns when they pass a crossing, a welcome development for Pelanconi Estates residents.

New at-grade safety enhancements can already be seen at the $6.6-million Flower Street crossing. Next up is a $4.9-million project to revamp the crossings at Sonora and Grandview avenues, which is slated to begin next month.

This week, the City Council approved another construction project that will coincide with the railroad crossing work. They unanimously appropriated about $688,000 to install underground vaults, conduits and other facilities that will support increased electrical needs in the nearby Grandview neighborhood.

Due to the growth of Disney and DreamWorks campuses in the Grandview neighborhood, the city plans to rebuild and upgrade its electrical infrastructure there.

In addition to the crossing work at Sonora and Grandview avenues, there are three others that also must be revamped before the city can apply for a “quiet zone.” Improvements at Broadway and Brazil Street may begin in May, said city spokesman Tom Lorenz.

Once that’s complete, construction is expected to begin on the Chevy Chase Drive crossing.

The crossing improvements are a joint project involving multiple agencies, including the Southern California Regional Rail Authority.

The Doran Street crossing, however, is still on hold as Los Angeles and Glendale officials await a decision from an administrative law judge about future plans for the crossing.

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Follow Brittany Levine on Google+ and on Twitter: @brittanylevine

 

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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