Ron Benedict, seen here in a 2007 photograph, is the golf course superintendent for Newport Beach Country Club. (KENT TREPTOW, Daily Pilot / March 11, 2012)

Ron Benedict and staff had to do "emergency surgery" to the golf course at Newport Beach Country Club two weeks ago. A good 'ole fashioned flush for two days for a course that is preparing to host the annual Toshiba Classic next month.

Benedict and his crew drenched the fairways and tee boxes under 4 1/2 feet of water to flush out the sodium from the turf. Salt is grass' enemy. Only one other time in Benedict's 22 years at the club have they had to soak the course. The culprit is lack of rainfall.

Benedict and 10 colleagues carry the responsibility of making the grass healthy and pretty, particularly in the lead-up to the Champions Tour event for professional golfers 50 and older. During tournament week, Benedict arrives from 3:30 a.m. to 4 a.m. to mow greens and change holes on the putting green.

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HIS BACKGROUND

Benedict was born in San Bernardino in 1957 and grew up in Thousand Oaks. He played Pop Warner football and remembers shagging balls when the Dallas Cowboys practiced nearby. He says one of his best jobs was installing irrigation systems for parks in Thousand Oaks.

From 1980 to 1987, he lived in Bishop. He took ski trips to Mammoth and headed to Bishop Country Club to get in a few holes before work. He saw the superintendent at Bishop Country Club and thought, "What a cool job. You're outside."

Benedict returned to Southern California in 1988, where he began his journey to superintendent. He took classes in plant pathology, landscape design and surveying en route to an associate's degree at College of the Desert.

A few years later, Gary Skolnik, a friend he met in school, was leaving a job at Newport Beach Country Club. Skolnik suggested Benedict apply. Benedict became assistant superintendent in 1990 and moved to head superintendent two years later.

The Toshiba Classic came to Newport Beach Country Club in 1996 after a year at Mesa Verde Country Club. Benedict remembers his first taste of working a pro golf tournament.

"I was overwhelmed," Benedict explains. "It was like I was hit by a freight train. The PGA Tour has certain specifications and all the infrastructure needs take up a lot of your time."

Vendors, such as California Pizza Kitchen, set up tents where they will serve food and Benedict advises to an extent the build up and tear down. He needs to make sure water pipes are set up properly.

Two instances stick out in his mind.

"One year a furniture truck backed up on a green. He wasn't trying to destroy my day," Benedict said. Then in 2010, "a truck made a U-turn during the night on a green. He realized where he was after the fact."

When asked why he has stayed at NBCC, Benedict replied: "If it's a clear day, I can see the Pacific Ocean. It is paradise."

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THE PREPARATION

It's a little past 10 on a brisk Monday morning, two weeks before the Toshiba Classic. Crews have erected hospitality tents. Wooden foundations wait for the temporary tents. Groups of 4-foot metal stakes wait to be pounded into the ground by workers wielding sledgehammers. Benedict walks into the pro shop. He's dressed in a dark green jacket, khaki pants and boots.

He is frustrated. The winds quelled his plans to fertilize the course.

He walks to his cart. On the seat rests a copy of Sports Illustrated. The wind flips open a page. Benedict has his coffee thermos nearby. He drives around the course, watching for any napkin, wrapper or cup that may have flown out of a cart.