The Ravens' giant offensive left tackle Bryant McKinnie proved Tuesday that he is the biggest drama queen in the country.

Team officials and McKinnie finally agreed on restructuring a new one-year deal still worth about about $3.2 million, but with more incentives.

The Ravens were smart in making the move, but they shouldn't have waited until the week before the regular season began to start negotiating. It didn't make much sense, and I hope they don't continue the practice.

A lot of players have been in this situation before, and most of them don't go complaining to the media when talks break down, but McKinnie was singing like the Temptations.

This is the kind of stuff you keep in private until negotiations are finished, not in the middle to late stages.

Both sides were posturing.

The Ravens were aware of McKinnie's money problems, and they wanted to get the best deal from a player who has had weight and conditioning problems throughout his career.

Knowing the Ravens, they wanted McKinnie to take a pay cut, and McKinnie wasn't going to back down.

McKinnie is a decent left tackle even in the twilight of his career. His $3.2 million salary this season is reasonable money for a left tackle, even though it's probably below market value for a starter.

The problem is that McKinnie isn't trustworthy. If he was on the roster for the first game, then the Ravens had to pay him for the entire season. So, if he decided to come up with a mysterious injury or illness, then the Ravens were obligated to pay the entire salary.

I understood the club's point, and I mentioned earlier today that the two sides would probably come to an agreement if the contract had more incentives based on playing time and performance. If they didn't, both sides would have been in trouble.

The Ravens would have been forced to start Michael Oher on the left side and rookie Kelechi Osemele at right tackle. Oher would do okay, but he is a better right tackle. Osemele would struggle with speed rushers on the outside. Bobbie Williams would have then started at left guard with an injured ankle that still isn't 100 percent.

Poor Joe Flacco. He would have gotten crushed.

As for McKinnie, he would have been left without a job and numerous unpaid creditors. He would definitely get another job in the league, but not the big pay day he would have demanded. A lot of teams back off from disgruntled players with money, weight and conditioning problems.

Especially, when they are drama queens.