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Three questions with Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher

For the second time in three years, Michael Oher has started all 16 regular-season games at left tackle. The organization's top pick in the 2009 NFL draft, Oher has yet to miss a start in his NFL career, stringing together a remarkable run of avoiding serious injury. The 26-year-old also leads the Ravens offensive line in total snaps played this season (1,058), according to Football Outsiders. But Oher finished the regular season ranked 39th among offensive tackles in pass-blocking efficiency and surrendered 10 sacks, nine hits and 26 hurries, according to Pro Football Focus. The 6-foot-4, 315-pound Oher will meet one of his tougher challenges in Sunday's AFC Wildcard playoff game against Colts outside linebacker Dwight Freeney. The 11-year veteran is Indianapolis' all-time leader in sacks and ranks fifth in the NFL among active players. Oher reviewed his performance in last Sunday's 23-17 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals, during which he played both the left and right tackle positions, and his history against Freeney.

How did it feel to return to right tackle during the game against the Bengals after starting all 16 games at left tackle? Did it feel like getting on a bike again?

"I was just blessed with the talent to do things like that. Just being a team player. Those are the kind of guys that the Ravens bring here. When you've got to do something like that, it's not problem for us. As for getting on a bike, I would say that it's totally different. I would say it's like being right-handed and going to your left hand."

In two career meetings, Dwight Freeney has recorded just two sacks and that's it. To what do you credit your success against him?

"Dwight's a great player. He's fast, very explosive. He has that great spin move, and I'm looking forward to playing against him."

When Freeney begins his move, what's the first impulse to race through your mind in terms of trying to slow him down and impede his progress?

"He's a great player overall. He's been great for a long time. But you've got to do different things against a guy like him to slow him down. You're not going to slow him down just by doing one thing. I think it's going to take more of an offensive effort more than anything. If you can slow down these great rushers, it comes with the offense, the entire offense slowing those guys down."

edward.lee@baltsun.com

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