Sunday’s game ended with pinch-runner Chris Dickerson getting doubled up at first base because he was on second during a foul pop-up in shallow right.

    It was a bad way to end a bad game.

     But Dickerson said afterward, no matter how it looked, it probably was unavoidable for him. He was stealing on the 0-2 pitch and though he heard the crack of the bat, he didn’t know where the ball was.

  He saw White Sox Alexi Ramirez shortstop looking like the ball had been hit on the ground behind Dickerson, who was in a full sprint and then sliding headfirst.

    “Ramirez deked at second like he was anticipating the ball coming to second, and I was already in the position where I had to slide anyways,” Dickerson said. “By that time, I was too far past. You can only go so far. Even if you do read it, who knows if you have a chance of getting back?”

     Fair point there. Dickerson was trying to steal second. Even if he had realized the ball was popped up and catchable, he may not have had time to reverse course since second baseman Leury Garcia had an easy throw to first base.

  The question is whether Dickerson should have peeked at the ball as he was running – which some basestealers do and some don’t (the ones that don’t think it slows then down).

      “It’s not something I’ve ever done. I keep hearing, ‘You should have peeked, you should have peeked.’ It’s not something I’ve ever done stealing bases,” Dickerson said. “For me, it’s the first two steps I’m getting down and then … my eyes are up looking at the reaction of the second baseman, third baseman and once they are looking behind me, I am picking up Bobby (third base coach Dickerson) and he’s going, ‘You know what to do.’  … Who knows, even if I did read it, what are the chances I am stopping and getting back anyways?”