Transforming Cole Field House into a national hub for sports medicine
Sports Orioles

In-Depth: Cal Ripken, Jr.

BIO: With his dogged march to become baseball’s Iron Man, Orioles Hall of Famer Cal Ripken captured the imagination of baseball fans everywhere as the sport tried to recover from a work stoppage that wiped out the 1994 World Series. But Ripken had already been a cherished son to Baltimore fans for many years when he broke Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games record on Sept. 6, 1995.

Raised in Harford County, Ripken was the son of longtime Orioles coach Cal Ripken Sr. He grew up around the team that would draft him. Ripken burst on the major league scene, winning Rookie of the Year honors in 1982 and claiming the American League MVP in 1983, when he caught the last out in his only World Series.

Even as the club’s fortunes diminished, Ripken remained one of the game’s most respected players, winning another MVP in 1991, finishing his career with more than 3,000 hits and entering the Hall of Fame with one of the highest voting percentages ever in 2007. With his stadium complex in Aberdeen and numerous business interest related to baseball, Ripken remains one of Baltimore’s favorite sports figures more than a decade after he retired from the Orioles.

BORN: Aug. 24, 1960, in Harve De Grace, Md.

PROFESSIONAL: Shortstop and third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles, 1981-2001

1 23w