Trying to keep up with the conference shuffle in women's lacrosse over the next two seasons will surely require a detailed score card.

Major shifts in the landscape are coming with the addition of the Big Ten next spring and changes in the Atlantic Coast Conference, historically the nation's toughest conference. This season, only two of Division I's 13 conferences -- the Ivy League and the Big South -- remain the same as last season.

The ACC makeover is already underway, creating a super conference for one year before Maryland departs for the inaugural Big Ten season in 2015. With the addition of Syracuse and Notre Dame from the Big East, the ACC now includes five Top 10 teams -- No. 1 North Carolina, No. 2 Maryland, No. 3 Syracuse, No. 6 Duke and No. 8 Virginia -- along with No. 11 Notre Dame and No. 17 Boston College.

In the Big East, Marquette and Temple help fill the void left by the departure of Syracuse, Notre Dame and Loyola.

The Greyhounds move to the Patriot League to challenge four-time defending champion Navy. Boston University also joins the Patriot League, leaving the America East Conference, UMBC’s home, with just six teams.

Defending champion Monmouth and Quinnipiac have left the Northeast Conference, Mount St. Mary's home, for the Metro Atlantic. That leaves the NEC with six teams.

The Atlantic 10 picked up George Mason from the Colonial Athletic Association and lost Temple to the Big East.

Three new teams swell the ranks of Division I women’s lacrosse to 103 as Michigan debuts in the American Lacrosse Conference, Elon in the Atlantic Sun and Colorado in the Mountain Pacific.

Next season, the Big Ten Conference will debut with Maryland, Northwestern, Penn State, Michigan, Ohio State and Rutgers.

After this spring, Johns Hopkins will join Northwestern, Penn State, Ohio State and Rutgers in withdrawing from the American Lacrosse Conference. The Blue Jays women will play an independent schedule unlike their men's program which will play in the Big Ten.