On NPR, Frank Deford talks about Bud Selig's decision to add an extra wild card team to each league this season, and the effect it's having on the postseason chances for several teams, including the Orioles.

Deford makes note of something that I've heard a lot recently on sports talk programs around the area -- the Orioles are somehow 10 games over .500 even though they have been outscored by a large margin and they're among the league's worst teams in several statistical categories.

Look right now, for instance, at the Baltimore Orioles, who are prominently in the expanded American League wild-card race despite being ninth in the league in ERA, 10th in batting average and worst in all the majors in fielding. That is, they can't pitch, hit or pick up the ball.

They are not the beautiful orange and black bird of their name but, rather, a version of the yellow and black bumblebee, which in common myth, aerodynamically isn't supposed to be able to fly, but does.

So the Baltimore Bumblebees still win more games even though they're outscored, overall. You know what? So did the New York Giants last year score fewer points than their opponents in the regular season, but then they got hot and won the Super Bowl.