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Sports Auto Racing

Where IndyCar failed, might NASCAR succeed?

The letter from the co-founders of Viva House was spot on ("Plenty of things to regret about the Grand Prix," Sept. 19). What it failed to do was explain how the cancellation of the Baltimore Grand Prix would make things better. Outside of making them feel better.

Without giving the public some sort of reason to think of Baltimore as home to something other then "The Wire," people will always think of Baltimore as "The Wire." The problem with the Grand Prix was it was too tony, too sophisticated for Baltimore. The is where NASCAR should step in. A NASCAR race would bring in millions of dollars, and the majority of the public would buy into it. It would be a win-win deal for everyone involved.

Problem is, Baltimore would still be the Baltimore of "The Wire," "The Corner," and "Homicide: Life On The Street." Most sad.

Randall Miller, Ocean View, Del.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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