After making a name for himself in motocross and extreme sports, Maryland native Travis Pastrana talks about his move into NASCAR. (Gene Sweeney Jr./Baltimore Sun video)

Travis Pastrana, the Maryland-born motocross and X Games superstar, has given up his NASCAR dream for now.

The 30-year-old Pastrana, from Davidsonville in Anne Arundel County, announced on his Facebook page Monday that he was taking a step back after driving on the Nationwide Series for a little more than two years, writing, "I hate to quit and I hate to fail, but sometimes things work out as they should.

“This past season of NASCAR has been an awesome experience. I have made a lot of great friends, had a lot of fun and gained a new appreciation for all aspects of this sport,” Pastrana wrote. “Jack Roush and everyone at Roush Fenway Racing have gone above and beyond to try and help me succeed and I am truly grateful for their support. I would like to thank them and all of the other people who stuck behind me during the last two years as I tried to learn how to make a successful career in NASCAR.

“It’s tough to step back now and prove the critics were right, but unfortunately my results were not good enough to get the sponsors I needed to appropriately fund next season.”

Pastrana is 14thin the Nationwide Series points standings heading into this weekend’s final race in Homestead, Fla. His best finish is ninth place in April’s ToyotaCare 250 at Richmond International Raceway. He has also finished 10ththree times. The Nationwide Series is the equivalent of baseball's Triple-A for stock car racing.

Making his name in the X Games while competing in motocross, supercross, rally racing and freestyle motocross, Pastrana will now watch his wife, Lyndsey, known to her skateboarding fans as Lyn-Z Adams Hawkins, compete on the Nitro Circus Live Tour. He wrote that he hopes to get back to rally and off-road truck racing.

Pastrana told The Baltimore Sun in late May while racing in Dover, Del., that he’s “never started so far at the bottom in another sport."

"It's hard because everyone's saying, 'Oh, you're going to NASCAR for the money,' and I'm actually turning down money and a place where I can be the best or have a chance to compete to be one of the top guys," he said. "I'm doing this because it's a challenge. We're going to learn, but it's not going to be quick."