Sea turtle research

A University of Central Florida biologist and other researchers have developed a method of gluing satellite-tracking devices to young loggerhead turtles to follow their mysterious journey from Florida beaches into the Atlantic Ocean. Kate Mansfield and the other scientists learned from 17 turtles equipped with the instruments that they donÕt simply ride currents to circle the ocean as generally thought, but they may take a long detour in a remote part of the Atlantic called the Sargasso Sea, where floating seaweed provides refuge and food. 

(Jim Abernethy, National Marine Fisheries Service permit 1551)
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( Jim Abernethy, National Marine Fisheries Service permit 1551 / March 6, 2009 )

A University of Central Florida biologist and other researchers have developed a method of gluing satellite-tracking devices to young loggerhead turtles to follow their mysterious journey from Florida beaches into the Atlantic Ocean. Kate Mansfield and the other scientists learned from 17 turtles equipped with the instruments that they donÕt simply ride currents to circle the ocean as generally thought, but they may take a long detour in a remote part of the Atlantic called the Sargasso Sea, where floating seaweed provides refuge and food. (Jim Abernethy, National Marine Fisheries Service permit 1551)

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