The Central Pennsylvania Animal Alliance (CPAA) again finds itself seeking financial help for a dogfighting victim.

The 2- to 3-year-old female pit bull named Honey was brought in to the York County SPCA by animal control officers Saturday morning. She was suffering from multiple puncture wounds on her head, face and legs, but the most serious of her injuries was to her lower jaw: a 2-inch section of her jaw bone is exposed where the skin has been ripped away. According to the SPCA veterinarian, the wounds were severely infected, as they were likely a couple days old.

Veterinarians are recommending a skin graft for Honey, with initial estimates of at least $6,500 for the surgery alone.

"It's beyond sick to allow a dog to suffer like this," said Zella Anderson, CPAA founder and director. "We need the community's help to pay for her extensive medical care, but even more so, we need people to open their eyes to the growing problem of dogfighting and work together to put a stop to it."

Anderson commended the York County SPCA for its quick action to ease Honey's suffering by sedating her, flushing her wounds and reaching out to find additional help for her.

This is the second time the two organizations have teamed up to help a dogfighting victim. Earlier this year, the SPCA rescued and treated Julep, a suspected bait dog who was found in very poor condition by a dumpster in February. A deceased dog was found nearby. The SPCA provided much of her initial care, but CPAA stepped in to help when Julep was diagnosed with a disease common among fighting dogs. Julep is now healthy and happy in her new home.

CPAA has also helped to rescue a number of suspected dogfight victims from the City of Harrisburg over the last several months.

"There is no question dogfighting is a serious problem in Central Pennsylvania, and it deserves serious attention from law enforcement," Anderson said. "People who fight dogs aren't otherwise good, law-abiding citizens – they tend to be involved in many other crimes, including theft, illegal gambling, drug dealing, gang activity and more."

CPAA launched an Anti-Dogfighting Task Force more than two years ago to raise awareness about dogfighting among law enforcement and the community as a whole. Although the prevalence of dogfighting is difficult to quantify because it is an "underground" activity, the Humane Society of the United States estimates 40,000 people nationwide participate in organized dogfighting, and hundreds of thousands more take part in impromptu street dogfighting.

For more information on dogfighting and how to recognize it and report it, visit http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/dogfighting/facts/dogfighting_fact_sheet.html

For more information or to make a donation to support Honey and CPAA's Anit-Dogfighting Task Force, visit www.cpaa.info. Updates on Honey's condition will be posted at www.Facebook.com/CentralPAAnimalAlliance.