New billboards will appear on the side of Southeast Queens buses Monday, imploring people to "stop the sag."

Senate President Malcom A. Smith has joined Brooklyn Democratic Senator Eric Adams in his campaign to convince young people to keep their pants around their waists.

The full message of the billboard will be, "Raise your pants – raise your image. We are better than this! Stop the sag!"

In a Youtube video, Adams calls the fashion trend just the latest in a long line of negative, stereotypical imagery degrading to black people, "but this time it is self-inflicted," Adams said.

However, in a recent interview hip hop mogul Russell Simmons said, "This is just the latest example of adults trying to suppress the creativity and originality of kids."

Sagging pants have long been a subject of popular debate – Bill Cosby addressed the style in his 2004 NAACP speech, asking, "What part of Africa did this come from?"

More recently there was the 62-year-old Internet sensation known as 'General' Larry Platt, the American Idol contestant who had the judges covering the faces in laughter with his rendition of "Pants on the Ground."

Senator Adams and Senate President Smith, however, are not amused by the trend, "particularly because the origin of this style comes from a prison culture," says Smith.

The billboards are meant to remind young people that they are being judged on how they dress, and to convince them not to "surrender control" over their images.