On this Independence Day, an 82-year-old Korean War veteran marched onto familiar stopping grounds in Harlem.

Then, under the statue of Adam Clayton Powell, the man he defeated to go to Washington D.C. in 1970, Congressman Charles Rangel held court with his army of supporters beside him.

The scene resembled a campaign stop, which is ironic because many, including Congressman Rangel, thought the election was over after his victory speech on the night of the Democratic primary on June 26.

"I thought this would be an appropriate time to say Thank God for this system," said Rangel during a news conference where he did not mention his opponent Adriano Espalliat or the word "victory."

Monday, State Senator Espalliat told PIX 11 News in a one-on-one interview that the voting process is "definitely broken."

As of now, Rangel stands with an 802 vote advantage.

Espilliat's campaign says they have a legitimate shot at a victory since there are more than 3,000 affidavit ballots. These are disputed votes, according Team Espalliat.

The 13th District which is primarily made up of Harlem, Washington Heights, and part of the Bronx suddenly becomes the 2012 version of Palm Beach County on Thursday when the 3,000 ballots are reportedly set to be counted.

Congressman Rangel's disappearance was surprising as well as questionable. He's already given a victory speech and has heard a concession speech.

In the eyes of thousands in the 13th Congressional District he's already won. It's not on him to prove victory, but rather Espaillat to do so. He is the one behind and has questioned the results.

If this were football, it would be similar to the Giants taking points off the board against the Patriots after winning the Super Bowl.

Rangel told PIX 11 News he's talking because, "the right thing is the right thing."

A political operative that has worked the streets of Harlem as well as Washington D.C., said that Rangel looks "desperate" by talking.

The election continues.