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Maryland Weather Meteorology, astronomy and climate conditions in the Baltimore region

Baltimore weather: Evening thunderstorms hit region

After a day of sweltering heat, evening scattered showers and thunderstorms Wednesday were expected to bring damaging winds and heavy rain and potential flooding, the National Weather Service warned.

Forecasters predicted a chance of showers and thunderstorms before 1 a.m. Thursday, then a slight chance of showers between 1 and 3 a.m.

On Thursday night, there will be another slight chance of showers and thunderstorms before 8 p.m., with a slight chance of showers between 8 p.m. and 2 a.m.

Every day this month has had at least a trace of rain. Last month was the wettest July for the city on record.

A Code Red alert was issued for Wednesday, with temperatures in the Baltimore region expected to reach a high of 93 degrees and a heat index of over 100 degrees.

“Heat is a silent killer,” Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen said in a news release advising of the dangers heat could bring for the young, elderly and those with chronic medical conditions.

“All residents should protect against hyperthermia and dehydration,” Wen said in a release. “It’s important to stay cool, stay hydrated, and stay in touch with your neighbors, especially seniors and medically frail individuals who live alone or without air conditioning during times of extreme heat.”

According to the health department, just one day of heat exposure can cause heat-related illnesses and death.

The alert led the city to open cooling centers at four Community Action Partnership Centers and several senior centers.

On Tuesday night, flash floods hit eastern Baltimore County, overflowing neighborhoods in Middle River and requiring emergency crews to rescue a few drivers who had become stranded in their cars.

Around a dozen roads in the White Marsh, Rossville and Middle River areas were closed for high water, according to the National Weather Service, including parts of MD-7 and the Pulaski Highway.

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