Micro moon

The full moon seen with Jupiter on Nov. 28, 2012, the last "micro moon" until 2014. (pictoWrit / November 28, 2012)

The Old Moon, January's full moon, rises shortly before midnight Wednesday within three hours of the lunar apogee, making some call it a "micro moon".

The moon reaches its furthest point in its orbit shortly before 9 p.m. At 11:52 p.m., the moon reaches its full phase. January’s full moon is also known as the Full Wolf Moon or Moon after Yule.

That coincidence will make it the smallest full moon of the year. At about 250,000 miles away, 4 percent further than the moon's average distance, it can appear about 14 percent smaller and 30 percent dimmer than a "super moon", a full moon that coincides with the moon's perigee, or closest distance to Earth in orbit.

The last time a full moon was distant enough to be considered a micro moon was Nov. 28, 2012.