Hurricane Sandy satellite image

Superstorm Sandy as it strikes the East Coast in late October 2012. (Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison / November 21, 2012)

Weather watchers described Hurricane Sandy's path as unusual as it plowed into the New Jersey coast, and satellite images may show just how strange it looked.

The view from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-14 satellite shows the storm churning through the Bahamas and off the Carolinas before it makes a beeline for the Jersey shore.

The animation was compiled by the Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

GOES-14 acts as a backup to two other main weather satellites that cover the western and eastern sides of the U.S. but because of problems with GOES-13 in the east, GOES-14 was activated for October. The satellite went back into storage mode early this month.

Satellite images meanwhile showed effects of the "superstorm", as the Wisconsin center detailed on a Sandy-focused blog, including:

Have a weather question? E-mail me at sdance@baltsun.com or tweet to @MdWeather.