Maldonado-Canales family

Shown are members of the Maldonado-Canales family, refugees from <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO00000182" title="El Salvador" href="/topic/international/el-salvador-PLGEO00000182.topic">El Salvador</a>. One son, Santos (black shirt) received asylum last year. Just last month his mom Maria and older brother Pablo (white button-dwon shirt) received asylum as well. However, unlike Santos's case, the U.S. government is appealing their asylum grant. So they're in limbo, together in a <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLGEO100100600000000" title="Maryland" href="/topic/us/maryland-PLGEO100100600000000.topic">Maryland</a> Suburb (they don't want location disclosed), but living with the possibility that Maria and Pablo could one day be sent back to El Salvador, where gangsters killed a third son, Jose Ever, and threatened others in the family (hence they're flight to the U.S.). Their father, also named Pablo, (cap) came to Maryland over a decade ago, legally, to work. Also shown is their immigration attorney, Azim Chowdhury (suit).

( Baltimore Sun photo by Gene Sweeney Jr. / September 1, 2010 )

Shown are members of the Maldonado-Canales family, refugees from El Salvador. One son, Santos (black shirt) received asylum last year. Just last month his mom Maria and older brother Pablo (white button-dwon shirt) received asylum as well. However, unlike Santos's case, the U.S. government is appealing their asylum grant. So they're in limbo, together in a Maryland Suburb (they don't want location disclosed), but living with the possibility that Maria and Pablo could one day be sent back to El Salvador, where gangsters killed a third son, Jose Ever, and threatened others in the family (hence they're flight to the U.S.). Their father, also named Pablo, (cap) came to Maryland over a decade ago, legally, to work. Also shown is their immigration attorney, Azim Chowdhury (suit).

  • Email E-mail
  • add to Twitter Twitter
  • add to Facebook Facebook
  • Home Delivery Home Delivery

READER SUNSHOTS CONTENT

Each week, we pick a different topic and ask users to share their photos with us. Then we pick the best image and display it online and in The Baltimore Sun with a critique from director of photography Robert Hamilton