John Kass: Hillary: I was once poor like you

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Hillary Clinton graced Chicago this week on her Planet Hillary Global Domination Tour as she seeks the presidency.

And she proved something the other day. She proved that she finally stands for something.

Hillary stands for people who are "dead broke" but also have multiple homes.

She bragged about it to a purring Diane Sawyer of ABC News, saying she really knows what it's like to struggle. It happened when her husband, former President Bill Clinton, left the White House.

Will someone have the decency to please cue the sad violin as Hillary recounts the ordeal of the multiple homes?

"We came out of the White House not only dead broke, but in debt," she said. "We had no money when we got there, and we struggled to, you know, piece together the resources for mortgages, for houses, for Chelsea's education.

"You know, it was not easy."

What's frightening is that she could talk like that without even blushing. The woman has all the shame of a tree.

And I guess you could say that wealthy Democrats who declare class warfare are different from you and me.

They're worth millions upon millions of dollars. They didn't do anything for the money except talk and play politics. That's the Clintons' special talent. They talk and talk and millions come to them and they feel our pain. And they don't blush.

Listening to Hillary tell the sob story of the multiple homes, you could almost hear a stressed woman whose husband lost his job -- a woman, say, who works as a cashier at some all-night supermarket and comes home to put her swollen feet in a pan of warm water.

Or the man working two or three part-time jobs, praying to God he has steady work to feed the kids macaroni and potatoes and keep a roof over his family's head.

I know people like that. I'm sure you do as well. They're not worried about their multiple homes or tuition at the nation's top private universities.

But that's Hillary. When she talked to Sawyer, you almost could hear Hillary's swollen feet sliding into that pan of warm water and salts.

Hers is the true politician's gift, to use a voice and get your vote. Of course, she has to feel your pain, too.

Except, what pain, exactly, Hillary, did you feel?

When the Clintons left the White House, there were millions upon millions of dollars waiting for them. Yes, there were legal bills from all the times Bill put his hands on women and lied about it, and when they were investigated for lying about the lies.

But their so-called friends raised millions and millions in legal defense funds.

The woman standing on her feet at the checkout counter, or rushing out to try to sell real estate part time after the kids have been fed, or the woman working as a teacher's aide doesn't have such friends.

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